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What jokes and phrases only make sense to the people in your Discord server?

My Rocket League group is largely composed of hockey fans—hence our Snow Day obsession—and so we spend most matches replicating the absurd banter of NHL color commentators: Four lines banging all night. Gotta get to the dirty areas. Good things happen when you get pucks to the net. Take the hit to make the play.

As in the NHL, our best exclamations come after a filthy goal, at which point our Discord icons light up with such classics as "piss on my hands!"

I can't take credit for any of this—Snow Day pals Julez and Juxxt are the most prolific commentators, and started the trend—but my exclamation of "adopt me!" after Julez dismantled our opponents the other day is now canon. I have a new dad.

We use NHL standards, too: "top shelf where mama keeps the cookies" (there is some debate over whether it should be cookies or something else), "an absolute laser," and Mike Lange's (opens in new tab) "shave my face with a rusty razor," as seen recently in reference to a Bryan Rust goal. 

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I like how sub-sub-cultures develop on Discord servers (or other voice chat severs (opens in new tab), though everyone I know has migrated). There's a common language to each game—"banana" in Counter-Strike, for instance—but then there are the terms that are entirely localized within small groups. I wonder, for instance, if anyone else calls Rocket League dangles, jukes, and fakes "goofs" like we do? Do they understand what we mean when we say "ya goofed me" in text chat? 

It got me curious to know: what phrases have you only heard in your group, be it about Rocket League or any other game? So for this mid-week Q&A, let us know your favorite inside gags and localized terminology in the comments. Maybe we've all been saying the same things?

(Speaking of Discord servers, PC Gamer has its own, which you can access by becoming a Club member (opens in new tab).)

Tyler grew up in Silicon Valley alongside Apple and Microsoft, playing games like Zork and Arkanoid on the early personal computers his parents brought home. He was later captivated by Myst, SimCity, Civilization, Command & Conquer, Bushido Blade (yeah, he had Bleem!), and all the shooters they call "boomer shooters" now. In 2006, Tyler wrote his first professional review of a videogame: Super Dragon Ball Z for the PS2. He thought it was OK. In 2011, he joined PC Gamer, and today he's focused on the site's news coverage. After work, he practices boxing and adds to his 1,200 hours in Rocket League.