Best gaming mouse in 2024: I've tested the very best mice and these are my top picks

The best gaming mouse provides you with the most satisfying sweeps, clicks, and hand-feelTM possible. Whether it's lining up a perfect headshot in Counter-Strike 2 or allowing for pixel-perfect unit placement in League of Legends, the last thing you need is an unreliable rodent costing you the game. And if you're looking into a wireless gaming mouse, it should have all that and a long battery life, too.

The best wireless gaming mouse is the Razer DeathAdder V3 Pro. With its superb ergonomics, pin-sharp wireless performance and accurate sensor, it's a great pick for a wireless mouse without the drawbacks. The best wired gaming mouse is the Razer DeathAdder V2, which manages to combine high-speed performance and great ergonomics into one neat and tidy wired package.

You don't need to spend a fortune to get a great gaming mouse. The best budget wireless mouse is the Logitech G305 Lightspeed, while the best wired gaming mouse is the Logitech G203 Lightsync—both have great features and performance, all while being very affordable.

Curated by...
Dave James
Curated by...
Dave James

Dave's been wielding mice in anger since the hoary ol' days of the Amiga 500, Deluxe Paint, and Dune 2. He even plugged one into his Commodore 64 once, but he got over that. He's had his paws on gaming mice from every big manufacturer over the past couple decades, from ultra-lights and wireless, to many-buttoned horrors made for MOBAs. So, he know a thing or two about PC rodents.

The quick list

Recent updates

Updated on April 30, 2024 to make sure all our recommendations are still relevant and streamline each entry, to make it even easier to see what's right for you. Our latest mouse reviews have been added to the Also Tested section so you can see what the mouse market is like at the moment.

The best wireless gaming mouse

The best wireless gaming mouse

Specifications

DPI: 30,000
Sensor: Focus Pro 30K Optical
Interface: USB wireless dongle, USB Type-C removeable dable
Buttons: 5
Ergonomics: Right-handed
Weight: 63 g (2.22 oz)
Battery: 90 hours rechargeable

Reasons to buy

+
Excellent ergonomics
+
Impeccable wireless performance
+
Great sensor and tracking
+
Very good battery

Reasons to avoid

-
Seriously pricey
-
Not great outside of gaming
-
Kinda generic looking
Buy if...

✅ If you're looking for a great feel: The DeathAdder V3 Pro has a comfortable profile, with a micro-texture coating that feels great in the hand.

If you want wireless without the drawbacks: It's lightning fast to respond, and thanks to an excellent sensor, as accurate as you like, too. 

Don't buy if...

If you're on a budget: With an MSRP of $150 it's a pricey little rodent, although the performance and comfort on tap makes it a compelling buy regardless.

If you want flashy looks: For a Razer product, the DeathAdder V3 is downright subtle. Great for some, but RGB fans might want to look elsewhere.

Razer doesn't like to mess with a winning formula, so it should come as no surprise to see that we think the latest DeathAdder V3 Pro is the best wireless gaming mouse you can buy right now.

This version has been slimmed down, with subtle design changes, compared to its predecessor. Gone are the massively flared-out mouse buttons and the slippery smooth shell in favour of a slimmer, less aggressive profile that has more in common with some of Razer's more recent mice than those of previous generations.

It's still very much a right-hander's mouse thanks to the slanted curve of the mouse's hump that leans ever so comfortably into your palm, although it's not quite as right-hand focussed as some. The shell also has a new micro-texture coating, which helps keep the now 63 g mouse (a 25% drop in weight) from flying out of your hand in the heat of battle. 

The DeathAdder V3 Pro features Razer's Focus Pro 30K Optical sensor with a 70G acceleration and a maximum speed of 750 inches per second for 99.8% accuracy. No one will play at such a ludicrous DPI but combined with a few tricks like Asymmetric cut-off, Motion sync, and Smart tracking, you’ll never claim that the mouse is why you lost that match.

For the main switches, the V3 Pro gets third-generation Razer optical mouse switches with a lightning-fast 0.2 ms response time and a stated life of 90 million clicks. That makes it incredibly fast to react and should also help with longevity concerns.

Most users won't notice any big difference between using the DeathAdder V3 Pro wireless or wired, but in the case of the former, you can use an 8,000 Hz polling rate for ultimate lag-busting. It will chop the normal 90 hours of battery life down to a paltry 17 hours if you do though.

One thing you won't get with this mouse is a lot of buttons, as there are only six to choose from, unlike the multitude of options on the Logitech G502 X. Still, it's fast, comfortable, and supremely accurate in the right hands. If you fancy yourself an esports pro who needs a no-nonsense, hyper-focused slaying machine, the DeathAdder V3 Pro is the best wireless gaming mouse by far.

Read our full Razer DeathAdder V3 Pro review.

The best wired gaming mouse

The best wired gaming mouse

Specifications

DPI: 20,000
Sensor: Optical
Interface: USB Type-A fixed cable
Buttons: 6
Ergonomics: Right-handed
Weight: 82 g (2.9 oz)
Battery life: N/A

Reasons to buy

+
One of the best sensors available
+
A bargain price since V3 launched
+
Ideal shape for palm or claw grips 
+
Supports a variety of hand sizes 

Reasons to avoid

-
Buttons on the flimsy side
Buy if...

✅ If you want speedy responses: Thanks to a brilliant sensor underneath and some optical switches, the DeathAdder V2 makes for a super-fast gaming mouse.

If you're looking for comfort: A pleasing shape and good use of plastics makes this a great feeling mouse under your hands.

Don't buy if...

If you've got a heavy-handed click: While the DeathAdder V2 is certainly built well, the buttons can feel a little bit flimsy.

If you're on a budget: With a $70 price tag the Razer isn't cheap for a wired mouse, although you do get a lot of performance for the cash.

The Razer DeathAdder V2 improves on everything we love about the DeathAdder Elite, which itself is a great mouse, and as a result, it's an easy choice for being the best wired gaming mouse. 

The most obvious improvement with the V2 over the original DeathAdder is the Focus+ Optical Sensor, the same one used in the excellent Razer Viper Ultimate Wireless. It goes up to 20,000 DPI/CPI, tracks up to 650 inches per second, and has a 99.6% resolution accuracy. Those numbers may or may not mean much to you and they’ll make very little difference in day-to-day performance. How often do you need to go above 16,000 DPI/CPI? Not often.

To be honest, we were more impressed by the less obvious changes Razer has made for the V2. The first is the scroll wheel ("Instinctive Scroll Wheel Tactility") and it has exactly the right tightness, spinning smoothly, but still letting you feel every notch of the turn, so you won’t accidentally scroll too many times.

The left and right mouse buttons are more durable than the Elite, too. They’re optical, rather than mechanical (they use an infrared light beam to register clicks), which means they should deliver fewer misclicks, lower latency, and have a longer life. Razer reckons they’ll last 70 million clicks, rather than the 50 million for the old DeathAdder Elite.

However, the buttons are a bit flimsy under your fingertips. They feel fine when you’re clicking them straight on, but the slightest amount of sideways pressure makes them move slightly off-center. It makes us think they couldn’t take much of a beating, like throwing the mouse into your backpack before you head out on the road. 

That being said, the build quality otherwise is grand, although if you're looking for a wired mouse for cheaper that still demonstrates excellent build quality and fundamentals, then the Logitech G203 Lightsync is worth consideration too.

Still, as premium wired mice go the Razer DeathAdder V2 is ultimately the very best we've tested to date, and a worthy winner of the title of the best wired gaming mouse.

Read our full Razer DeathAdder V2 review.

The best budget wireless gaming mouse

3. Logitech G305 Lightspeed

The best budget wireless gaming mouse

Specifications

DPI: 12,000
Sensor: Optical Hero
Interface: USB Type-A wireless dongle
Buttons: 6
Ergonomics: Ambidextrous (left-side thumb buttons)
Weight: 99 g (3.05 oz)
Battery: 250 hours, AA cell

Reasons to buy

+
Amazingly light, with solid build quality
+
Logitech's best sensor in an affordable body

Reasons to avoid

-
Lacks premium Logitech feel
Buy if...

✅ You want a pure, unfussy gaming mouse: The G305 Lightspeed focusses on the basics, and does them well: fast performance, clicky buttons, great accuracy.

You want great battery life: While you'll need to swap out an AA battery rather than charge an internal unit, you will at least get 200 hours of usage out each one, which is pretty good going. 

Don't buy if...

You want a rechargeable battery as standard: While rechargeable AA batteries are relatively cheap, it'd be nice if the G305 had an internal unit instead.

You want a lot of features: The G305 Lightspeed offers everything you need, but not a huge amount extra.

With the Logitech G305 Lightspeed, Logitech has created a high-performance mouse that doesn't cost the earth, and that makes it our best budget wireless gaming mouse. Despite the low cost, there's no compromise in performance or design.

The G305 Lightspeed might not be the latest model on the market, but don't let that bother you. A good mouse is a good mouse. It's still a great value option for day-to-day use, while its light weight makes it well suited to fast-paced shooters where reaction time is paramount.

The G305 uses Logitech's Hero sensor, an iteration of the fantastic sensor Logitech's best mice, from the classic G502 down to the G Pro X Superlight. This sensor has a sensitivity range of up to 12,000 CPI (counts per inch) and can be adjusted via a button underneath the scroll wheel.

In addition to the CPI button, there are five programmable buttons. Of course, there are the left and right click buttons, which are joined by a scroll wheel and two side buttons. These are well placed for the righties out there; lefties are out of luck, though.

The left- and right-click buttons are separate pieces from the removable palm rest, ensuring a reliable and satisfying click. They're rated for 10 million clicks too, so if you're playing games that require button mashing, the G305 will serve you well. Not bad for a budget option, and something that'll likely last you for many years of heavy clicking.

Logitech has won praise for its 2.4 GHz wireless technology and cross-device compatibility. Even though lag shouldn't be an issue, the G305 comes with a USB extension cable, allowing you to place the receiver close to the mouse. The small wireless dongle can be stored inside the body of the mouse, where the single AA battery resides (which is good for a claimed 200 hours). 

The shape of the G305 is based on a small, symmetrical design Logitech has been using for years. While components like the scroll wheel and buttons don't feel as premium as those in the G502, they're still far better than anything you'll find in a cheap gaming mouse. The quality and performance of the G305 are killer features for its price.

The best budget wired gaming mouse

The best budget wired gaming mouse

Specifications

DPI: 8,000
Sensor: Optical
Interface: USB Type-A fixed cable
Buttons: 5
Ergonomics: Right-handed
Weight: 85 g (3.0 oz)
Battery life: N/A

Reasons to buy

+
An affordable bargain
+
Great shape for those who like smaller mice
+
Three-zone RGB lighting

Reasons to avoid

-
Feature-light
-
Less DPI granularity
Buy if...

✅ If you don't want to spend a lot on the basics: Sounds obvious, but the little Logitech is cheap, without feeling like it's lacking in quality.

If you'd like some RGB lighting: Three zone lighting is a nice bonus for such an affordable mouse. 

Don't buy if...

If you want a ton of features: It's basic, and that's actually it's biggest strength. If you're looking for a lot of extra buttons and do-hickeys though, it'd be worth spending up a bit.

The Logitech G203 Lightsync is our go-to choice for the best budget wired gaming mouse, as it's got everything you need in a basic mouse setup for less, with some nice touches that elevate it above most of the other options at this sort of price point.

Its no-nonsense design refines everything down to the bare essentials, but it still looks and feels like a premium product, just with a $40 price tag that raises eyebrows but does nothing to detract from the quality you feel when you use it on the daily.

The G203 Lightsync is a wired mouse—it's Lightspeed that you're looking for if you're after a wireless rodent—and the name denotes this mouse's compatibility with the Logitech G app and RGB lighting system, which can unify RGB lighting effects across compatible Logitech products.

The three lighting zones all lie within the thin strip that spans the rear palm rest, with the logo reflecting the same color as the middle RGB lighting zone. While it might've been nice to have independent control of the logo itself, the option does allow for gorgeous tri-color gradient effects sweeping from one side of the mouse to the other.

It has the same near-symmetrical as Logitech's Lightspeed range, complete with two buttons under where the pad of your right-hand thumb would sit. These aren't removable or swappable to the opposite side, though, which makes the G203 Lightsync less suited to left-handed gamers.

While the G203 Lightsync is a very comfortable day-to-day handler, it's worth noting that you can get even more comfort and button options by spending a little bit more up the Logitech line on the Logitech G502 X.

That being said, this budget option is still nothing to sniff at. The unnamed "gaming-grade" sensor within the G203 offers a DPI range of 200-8,000, which should prove more than enough for all but the most colossal of 4K monitors.

It might be basic, but the Logitech G203 is really everything you need in a good gaming mouse, with all the excess fat trimmed off. There are fancier and faster mice, but if all you're looking for is a great mouse on a budget, then the G203 makes the best pick for a budget gaming mouse that feels and looks anything but.

Read our full Logitech G203 Lightsync review.

The best ergonomic gaming mouse

The best ergonomic gaming mouse

Specifications

DPI: 25,600
Sensor: Opto-mechanical
Interface: USB Type-A fixed cable
Buttons: 11
Ergonomics: Right handed
Weight: 89 g (3.1 oz)
Battery life: N/A

Reasons to buy

+
Impeccable ergonomics
+
Sturdy and well built
+
Light with unobstructive wire
+
Interchangeable thumb buttons

Reasons to avoid

-
No improvements to the sensor
-
Lightforce switches sound a little clunky
Buy if...

✅ If you want exceptional ergonomic comfort: The G502 X is massively comfortable, thanks to an ergonomic shape paired with a well-placed thumb rest that keeps your hand in the optimum position.

If you want great build quality, without the heaviness: A good mouse doesn't have to be heavy to feel like a substantial and well-constructed product, and the G502 proves it. 

Don't buy if...

If you're looking for silence: The Lightforce switches may be positive and decently quick, but they make a bit of a clunk that might annoy your living companions if they're in the same room. 

At first glance Logitech's G502 X gaming mouse may not appear much different to its predecessors, that's just as well as they were great performers. However, the thing that it nails down hardest is comfort, and as a result, it's the best ergonomic gaming mouse we've used by far.

Logitech has doubled down on making the Logitech G502 X lighter than its predecessors. It weighs in at 89g, which is remarkably light given the features on offer, yet feels none the worse for being so featherweight underneath your fingertips.

There's no LED system behind the Logitech G symbol, or any RGB at all. And while that's a little disappointing that you can't program damage flashes on your mouse, for example, it makes sense to appeal to the FPS audience more. While the scroll wheel is now plastic instead of metal to improve the weight, it still comes with an infinite scroll, one of our absolute favourite features and a joy to use for productivity tasks.

The G502 X may not come with an updated sensor compared to the previous model, but the switches are now Lightforce hybrid switches. They're opto-mechanical, so they combine optical speed with a mechanical actuation. They sound a little clunky but that's likely due to the lack of internal components tucked in the mouse.

As far as pricing goes, it's being shipped at roughly the same price as the earlier models: $80 for the wired version, $140 for the wireless version, and $160 for the G502 X Plus. The latter is the only one with RGB, which pushes the weight up 106g, over the wired version.

Those of you looking for something a bit cheaper with some similar RGB goodies might want to check out the Logitech G203 Lightsync above, although you will be missing out on some of the features here.

The previous model was a near-perfect gaming mouse and you may feel that it didn't need to lose any weight, although the ergonomic changes are likely better for your hand. You may not like it, though, if you have larger hands or don't get on with slanted mice.

Regardless of this, the G502 X is the evident choice for the sensible and ergonomically-inclined among us. It's light, comfortable, immensely well-built and just the thing for all-day usage, making this our absolute top pick for ergonomic mice.

Read our full Logitech G502 X review.

The best competitive gaming mouse

The best competitive gaming mouse

Specifications

DPI: 25,600
Sensor: Hero 25K
Interface: USB Type-A fixed cable
Buttons: 11
Ergonomics: Right handed
Weight: 89 g (3.1 oz)
Battery life: N/A

Reasons to buy

+
Great build quality
+
Classic look
+
Affordable

Reasons to avoid

-
Some slippage
-
Feature-lite
Buy if...

✅ If you want simple, efficient, and fast: There's no frills on the Logitech G Pro, and those looking for an unfussy design that gets to the point will appreciate the simplicity.

If you want a great sensor: The Hero 25K sensor is a stellar performer, wrapped up here in a package that lets the performance do the talking.

Don't buy if...

If you want a lot of features: Nope, just fast performance and the basic standard buttons here. For some that'll do just the trick, and for others, you'll be looking for more.

When it comes to esports and competitive gaming, you're going to be looking for a fast, light, un-fussy and super-responsive mouse. The Logitech G Pro is all of these things and more, so it's the obvious pick for the best competitive gaming mouse.

Logitech's Hero 25K optical sensor has a maximum DPI of 25,600, which makes it plenty fast and accurate in a variety of mice, but paired with the simple design here means you can get on with the business of being super-accurate in your games without any extra buttons or design features getting in your way.

The left and right buttons are clicky and satisfying to use, without being overly loud, while the side buttons sit in exactly the right place under your thumb for instinctive usage, without having to stretch or strain to find them.

While no one would call the G Pro flashy, it's a handsome, professional-looking design that's likely to suit most setups, with some subtle RGB that hints at its gamer credentials rather than shouts them from the rooftops.

The Logitech G Pro isn't going to wow you with its visual design but what will impress you is how well it plays. It's a tried and true design, so long as you're not expecting a boatload of features.

If you don't care about thumb rests or extra buttons, and need quality gaming performance that will last for less than $100, the Logitech G Pro is your rodent. It's the best competitive mouse for e-sport players, MMO fiends, or anyone looking for a lightning-fast mouse without the fuss.

Read our full Logitech G Pro review.

The best MMO gaming mouse

The best MMO mouse

Specifications

DPI: 20,000
Sensor: Razer Focus+ optical sensor
Interface: USB Type-A removable cable, USB wireless dongle, Bluetooth
Buttons: 3 swappable side plates with up to 19+1 programmable buttons
Ergonomics: Right-handed
Weight: 117 g (4.1 oz)
Battery life: 150 hours

Reasons to buy

+
Customizable thumb grip with three different button arrays
+
Razer mouse charging Dock Chroma Compatible

Reasons to avoid

-
Chunky and heavy
Buy if...

✅ If you're looking for ultimate button customisation: Those magnetic side panels give you so many potential options, it's mind-boggling.

If you're looking for large and in charge: The Naga Pro is big, it's true, but it's also very comfortable, and suits those with larger hands.

Don't buy if...

If you want something basic and affordable: It's a bit pricey, but all those extra features had to come with a cost somewhere. If you don't need the extra buttons, this might not be the mouse for you.

Razer's Naga Pro has a serious party trick and it's a doozy. While it's got great performance and aesthetics, swappable side plates that enable a multitude of button configurations make this the best MMO gaming mouse.

We're fans of Razer's optical-mechanical switches, which use light to register clicks instead of mechanics, and that makes them really fast. The switches are durable too, with a lifespan of 70 million clicks, but of course, the Naga Pro has plenty of other buttons too. The three swappable plates have 2, 6, and 12 buttons which you can remap to your heart's content.

Remapping buttons in Razer Synapse is child's play—a simple point-and-click affair. You can do anything from simple keyboard shortcut bindings to complex game macros as well as adjust DPI stages, polling rates, lift-offs, power management, and of course, Razer Chroma lighting.

The overall design of Naga Pro stays close to the Naga Trinity it replaced but has gained a bit of weight to accommodate the new tech. The Naga Pro is 7mm wider and heavier than the Trinity at 117g, but thanks to the 100% PTFE feet, it glides smoothly across most surfaces.

As a somewhat big mouse, it takes some getting used to, requiring a full palm grip to get the most out of it. Luckily enough, the contoured mouse buttons and rest for your ring finger make it easy and comfortable to hold onto, while textured rubber grips for the thumb and pinky also play their part in making this a very pleasing object to hold. 

The Naga Pro's optical sensor has also been updated to the Razer Focus+ 20,000 DPI sensor with 650 IPS tracking. Equally fast is the HyperSpeed Wireless dongle, which has a very low latency, roughly half that of the Bluetooth connection.

You're really not going to find anything quite like the Razer Naga Pro. It's got customisation options that other mice can merely dream of, and its sheer flexibility and performance can transform your MMO experience. It's no wonder it's the best MMO gaming mouse you can buy.

Read our full Razer Naga Pro review.

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Also tested

Glorious Model D 2

Glorious Model D 2
This a light and nice-looking mouse that encourages you to waste its battery life with superfluous lights. It doesn't offer anything better than the competition, though.

Read our full Glorious Model D 2 review.

Mountain Makalu Max

Mountain Makalu Max
Almost a great gaming mouse but the wireless experience is frustrating in a way its rivals aren't. The customisation options are great, it feels comfortable in the hand, and the sensor is reliable and accurate, but it's just a little short of being the full package.

Read our full Mountain Makulu Max review.

Glorious Model D 2 Pro 4K/8KHz Edition

Glorious Model D 2 Pro 4K/8KHz Edition
The mouse achieves what it sets out to do: provide competitive gamers with an absurd polling rate. Though ask yourself this, do you really need it? The answer is probably no, in which case there's the cheaper 1KHz version

Read our full Glorious Model D 2 Pro 4K/8KHz Edition review.

Glorious Model O 2 Wireless

Glorious Model O 2 Wireless
This is an awesome lightweight wireless gaming mouse packed with features for a reasonable price. The only sore spot is a less-than-stellar battery life that requires some effort to get the most amount of game time.

Read our full Glorious Model O 2 Wireless review.

Endgame Gear XM2we

Endgame Gear XM2we
A humble, solid pointer that’s silky smooth on your mat. The XM2we is just a little expensive against the competition.

Read our full Endgame Gear XM2we review.

HyperX Pulsefire Haste 2 Wireless

HyperX Pulsefire Haste 2 Wireless
HyperX brings you the performance and battery life you want in a lightweight wireless gaming mouse. The $90 price tag is also good enough to surpass some of its software woes.

Read our full HyperX Pulsefire Haste 2 Wireless review.

How to spot the best deal

Where are the best gaming mouse deals?

Best gaming mouse Q&A

Why should I choose a gaming mouse over the average optical mouse?

For one thing, gaming mouse sensors are designed to be more responsive and accurate. With adjustable (or no) smoothing and acceleration, your aim will stay true. Gaming mice are more accessible because of their programmable buttons and versatility over a traditional mouse.

Is a wireless mouse good for gaming?

Historically the answer was always: no. The wireless connection, though convenient, was used to add extra latency to the connection compared with a wired cable, which meant input lag in games was 'a a thing'. For reference, that is also seen as a 'very bad thing' in competitive online games.

But modern wireless interfaces, primarily the 2.4 GHz radio connections, have zero perceptible difference in latency compared to a standard wired connection. Blind tests have been done with pro gamers using wired and wireless mice, and if the most sensitive players around can't tell the difference, we're confident you won't be able to either.

Bluetooth connections, however, can still introduce unwelcome input lag into a gaming situation, so that's best avoided. In modern wireless gaming mice, however, Bluetooth is only used as a low-power backup option.

What should I look out for in a gaming mouse?

When deciding on a mouse, your priority should be finding one that's comfortable for your hand. There are numerous sizes, shapes, and weights to consider. You might have the coolest-looking mouse with the most practical array of buttons, but if it's not comfortable for you, you won't be able to settle in with it. There are plenty of ambidextrous gaming mice and gaming mice for lefties in the list, too—if the goofy stance is more your style.

In the last few years, most gaming mice have also adopted very high DPI sensors (or more accurately, CPI), so even a budget mouse will likely perform well. Most of these sensors can handle extremely high DPI counts at up to 20,000 DPI when realistically, you'll play on a much lower sensitivity—generally under 2,000 DPI.

The consensus is not to worry about that number too much. Instead, concentrate on finding a mouse with the ideal shape and weight, and obviously, one that'll match your stylish set-up.

Pro gamers generally recommend lighter, more straightforward mice with few buttons to get in the way. Lighter mice won't fatigue your wrist and can easily glide across the mouse pad at high speeds. Anything below 100 grams is often ideal for competitive mice. But something has to be said about how powerful you feel at the helm of a nice heavy mouse. 

How we test gaming mice

We've used enough gaming mice to have a good feel for build quality, button placement, and shape. Our opinions on those aspects of mouse design are naturally subjective, but they're also well-informed. The tricky part of testing gaming mice is analyzing the other part of the equation: tracking performance, jitter, angle snapping, acceleration, and perfect control speed, and determining how each of those issues affects the experience of using a mouse.

For that, applications such as Mouse Tester come in handy. We used this software to see if we could spot any glaring issues with the mice we used. In every gaming mouse we tested, though, angle snapping and acceleration were disabled in the mouse drivers by default (though a mouse can still exhibit acceleration from issues with the sensor itself) and never encountered any glaring performance issues.

For gaming, we primarily test mice with Destiny 2 and Apex Legends and twitchier shooters like Quake Champions to see how our performance stacks up against other mice. We scrutinize the cursor movement and responsiveness for lag, jitter, and other issues.

We use each mouse with its wireless receiver plugged into close by USB port, giving it the best possible wireless situation to work with. We also tested the wireless receivers plugged into our test system a few feet away with my legs in between, increasing the opportunity for lag and interference.

Jargon buster

Grip refers to how you hold the mouse. The most common grips are palm, claw, and fingertip. Here's a good example of how each grip works.

CPI stands for counts per inch, or how many times the mouse sensor will read its tracking surface, aka your mousepad, for every inch it’s moved. This is commonly referred to as DPI, but CPI is a more accurate term. The lower the CPI, the further you have to move the mouse to move the cursor on the screen.

Jitter refers to an inaccuracy in a mouse sensor reading the surface it’s tracking. Jitter often occurs at higher mouse movement speeds or higher CPIs. Jitter can make your cursor jump erratically, and even small jitter could wreck a shot in an FPS or make you misclick on a unit in an RTS.

Angle snapping, also called prediction, takes data from a mouse sensor and modifies the output to create smoother movements. For example, if you try to draw a horizontal line with your mouse, it won’t be perfect—you’ll make some subtle curves in the line, especially at higher sensitivities. Angle snapping smooths out those curves and gives you a straight line instead. This is generally bad because it means your cursor movements won’t match your hand’s movements 1:1, and angle snapping will not be useful in most games. Thankfully, almost all gaming mice have angle snapping disabled by default.

Acceleration is probably the most reviled, most scrutinized issue with gaming mouse sensors. When a mouse sensor exhibits acceleration, your cursor will move faster the faster you move the mouse. This is often considered bad because moving the mouse slowly six inches across a mousepad will move the cursor differently than moving the mouse rapidly the same distance. This introduces variability that can be hard to predict.

Perfect control speed, or malfunction rate, refers to the speed at which the mouse can be moved while still tracking accurately. Most gaming mice will track extremely accurately when moved at slow speeds, but low CPI players will often move their mice large distances across the mousepads at very high speeds. At high speeds, especially at high CPIs, not all mouse sensors can retain their tracking accuracy. The point at which the sensors stop tracking accurately will differ between CPI levels.

IPS measures inches per second and the effective maximum tracking speed of any given sensor is rated too. Not to be confused with the gaming monitor panel type by the same name, the higher the IPS of any given mouse, the better it can keep up with high-speed movement and maintain accuracy.

Lift-off distance is still a popular metric in mouse enthusiast circles, though it does not affect most gamers. LOD refers to the height a mouse has to be raised before the sensor stops tracking its surface. Some gamers prefer a mouse with a very low lift-off distance because they play at very low sensitivity and often have to lift their mouse off the pad to reset it in a position where they can continue swiping. With a low LOD, the cursor will not be moved erratically when the mouse is lifted.