Powerful $750 gaming laptops to OLED gaming monitors to $48 1TB SSDs: these are the top ten early Black Friday deals this week

Four pieces of PC gaming hardware
(Image credit: Alienware | Asus | Yeyian | TeamGroup)

Black Friday is less than a month away now, and we're still in that sweet spot just before everyone starts to put their prices up so they can pretend they've got comparatively bigger discounts on Black Friday itself. That means the deals here have a pretty good chance of being the same sort of price once the real deals madness begins in earnest towards the end of the month.

To ensure a little confidence in what you're spending your cash on if you do buy early, Best Buy and Newegg have both created a kinda of pricing guarantee. We've broken down Newegg and Best Buy's Black Friday price promises to give you a clear picture of where they can and can't help you.  

Newegg's version is the most comprehensive, and the one which requires the least effort on your behalf to get some cash back if the prices drop further, but only up to November 16th. That would indicate to me that you've got up until that date to make a reasonable early purchase before prices needlessly rise ahead of Black Friday itself.

We've been curating the best deals for a long time now, and these are our favorite early Black Friday PC gaming deals of the week. 

Today's top Black Friday deals

1. Asus TUF A16 | Radeon RX 7600S | AMD Ryzen 7 7735HS | 16GB DDR5 | 512GB SSD | 16-inch | 1200p | 165Hz | $1,099.99 $749.99 at Best Buy (save $350)

1. Asus TUF A16 | Radeon RX 7600S | AMD Ryzen 7 7735HS | 16GB DDR5 | 512GB SSD | 16-inch | 1200p | 165Hz | $1,099.99 $749.99 at Best Buy (save $350)
For a gaming laptop with close to RTX 4060-level gaming performance the TUF A16 feels like a genuine bargain. That 512GB SSD is a bit miserly, but everything else seems like excellent value for money. That RX 7600S GPU is a rare AMD mobile GPU, and sits above the RTX 4050 and a bit below the RTX 4060 in terms of performance. For a $750 gaming laptop, that's a good place to be.

Price check: Amazon $1,179.99 | Newegg $1,069.99

2. Alienware 34 AW3423DWF | 34-inch | 165Hz | QD-OLED | $1,099.99 $799.99 at Dell (save $250)

2. Alienware 34 AW3423DWF | 34-inch | 165Hz | QD-OLED | $1,099.99 $799.99 at Dell (save $250)
Alienware's fancy QD-OLED panel just got that little bit cheaper. It's still not exactly entry-level at $800, but think of it as a long term investment that will make every single gaming session pop. Once you've experienced per-pixel OLED-style lighting, you won't want to go back to LCD tech. You can read our Alienware QD-OLED review for more.

Price check: Best Buy $799.99

3. Lenovo Legion Pro 7i | Nvidia RTX 4080 | Intel Core i9 13900HX | 16-inch | 1600p | 240Hz | 32GB DDR5-5600 | 1TB NVMe SSD | $2,749 $2,099 at B&H Photo (save $650)

3. Lenovo Legion Pro 7i | Nvidia RTX 4080 | Intel Core i9 13900HX | 16-inch | 1600p | 240Hz | 32GB DDR5-5600 | 1TB NVMe SSD | $2,749 $2,099 at B&H Photo (save $650)
This is a great discount on the best RTX 4080 laptop I've tested even though the price has gone up $50 since Prime Day. It's a fantastic notebook, offering performance that can often match and sometimes beat an RTX 4090-based system (see our review). There's a high-performance CPU to back it up, a decent, bright 1600p screen, and a fair amount of storage. All with a discount.

Price check: Lenovo $2,385.44 | Amazon $2,699.99

4. Yeyian Gaming Desktop | Core i5 12400F | Nvidia RTX 4060 Ti | 16GB DDR4-3200 | 1TB SSD | $1,299 $999 at Newegg (save $300)

4. Yeyian Gaming Desktop | Core i5 12400F | Nvidia RTX 4060 Ti | 16GB DDR4-3200 | 1TB SSD | $1,299 $999 at Newegg (save $300)
For the price that we've only seen RTX 4060 machines discounted down to, here we've got a full RTX 4060 Ti build for less than $900. The Ti delivers gaming performance between the RTX 3060 Ti and RTX 3070, but with an extra fps boost in the shape of Frame Generation in the games that support it. The Intel CPU is a couple generations old now, but is still an excellent six-core, 12-thread chip, happily supporting both 16GB of DDR4 and that 1TB SSD.

5. Team Group CARDEA ZERO Z440 | 1TB| NVMe | PCIe 4.0 | 5,000MB/s read | 4,400MB/s write | $69.99 $47.99 at Newegg (save $22)

5. Team Group CARDEA ZERO Z440 | 1TB| NVMe | PCIe 4.0 | 5,000MB/s read | 4,400MB/s write | $69.99 $47.99 at Newegg (save $22)
This PCIe Gen 4 drive is good value for money. It's not as fast as other drives in this list, but it's good for a drive upgrade. As with all SSDs of this type, you might need a heatsink to keep it cool, but good airflow around it will probably do the job just as well.

6. Acer Nitro KG241Y | 24-inch | 1080p | 165Hz | VA | $173.99 $119.99 at Amazon (save $54)

6. Acer Nitro KG241Y | 24-inch | 1080p | 165Hz | VA | $173.99 $119.99 at Amazon (save $54)
If space is a premium, and a chonky 27-inch monitor is beyond your desk space, this bargain of a 24-inch screen will certainly deliver. It may be small by today's standards, but the VA panel delivers its 1080p resolution with a 165Hz refresh and that's all you need, right?

Price check: Newegg $148.99

7. Gigabyte GS27QC | 27-inch | 170Hz OC | 1440p | VA | $229.99 $195.99 at Amazon (save $34)

7. Gigabyte GS27QC | 27-inch | 170Hz OC | 1440p | VA | $229.99 $195.99 at Amazon (save $34)
Less than $200 for a decent 1440p 170Hz monitor from a proper brand like Gigabyte? What's not to like? Some would argue the VA panel, but it is rated at 1ms, albeit MPRT not GtG. The 250 nits brightness is modest, too. Still, the panel sports 4,000:1 static contrast, which is excellent.

Price check: Newegg $229.99

8. Gigabyte G5 | Core i7 12650H | RTX 4060 | 16GB DDR5-4800 | 512GB SSD | 15.6-inch 1080p 144Hz | $1,099.99$799.00 at Best Buy (save $300)

8. Gigabyte G5 | Core i7 12650H | RTX 4060 | 16GB DDR5-4800 | 512GB SSD | 15.6-inch 1080p 144Hz | $1,099.99 $799.00 at Best Buy (save $300)
This is a lot of laptop for not very much money. To start with, you're getting a 10-core, 16-thread CPU that will easily cope with pretty much any game you throw at it. There's an RTX 4060 Mobile graphics chip too, that supports DLSS upscaling and frame generation. The storage and RAM are a bit disappointing, and you'll probably want to upgrade it at some point with a large SSD. For portable gaming and school work, though, this Gigabyte G5 laptop will keep you and your wallet happy.

Price check: Amazon $849 (with less memory)

9. Asus ROG Zephyrus 14 | Nvidia RTX 4060 | AMD Ryzen 9 7940HS | 14-inch | 1080p | 144Hz | 16GB RAM | 512GB SSD | $1,599.99 $1,249.99 at Best Buy

9. Asus ROG Zephyrus 14 | Nvidia RTX 4060 | AMD Ryzen 9 7940HS | 14-inch | 1080p | 144Hz | 16GB RAM | 512GB SSD | $1,599.99 $1,249.99 at Best Buy
If you don't want a hulking gaming laptop, let me introduce the Zephyrus 14 (see our review): a 14-incher that can game without busting your bank balance or your shoulder when lugging it around—no-nonsense specs in a delightful package. This is the latest version with the RTX 40-series GPUs; this is a very smart package, though not the most affordable RTX 4060 machine by any stretch, it is still a good deal for this delightful little laptop.

Price check: Newegg $1,764.99

10. Skytech Chronos | Core i7 12700F | RX 7900 XTX | 1TB NVMe SSD | 16GB RAM | $2,099.99 $1,999.99 at Newegg (save $100)Price check:

10. Skytech Chronos | Core i7 12700F | RX 7900 XTX | 1TB NVMe SSD | 16GB RAM | $2,099.99 $1,999.99 at Newegg (save $100)
While you're going last-gen on the Intel CPU here, that's a rather beastly AMD GPU. It may not be a consistent RTX 4080 competitor, but it'll get the job done at 4K. Pair that with a nice chunk of storage, and you've got a decent gaming PC for the price.

Price check: Walmart $2,099.99

Where are the best Black Friday PC gaming deals?

Dave James
Managing Editor, Hardware

Dave has been gaming since the days of Zaxxon and Lady Bug on the Colecovision, and code books for the Commodore Vic 20 (Death Race 2000!). He built his first gaming PC at the tender age of 16, and finally finished bug-fixing the Cyrix-based system around a year later. When he dropped it out of the window. He first started writing for Official PlayStation Magazine and Xbox World many decades ago, then moved onto PC Format full-time, then PC Gamer, TechRadar, and T3 among others. Now he's back, writing about the nightmarish graphics card market, CPUs with more cores than sense, gaming laptops hotter than the sun, and SSDs more capacious than a Cybertruck.