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The best wireless gaming mouse in 2019

(Image credit: Razer, Logitech)

For the longest time, the best wireless gaming mouse felt like a bit of an oxymoron. Plagued by poor performance, insufficient battery life and lack of adoption by peripheral manufacturers, wireless mice were often relegated to being not much more than a novelty. Fortunately, those days are behind us, and going wireless with your peripherals no longer has to be synonymous with compromise.

When you're looking for a wireless mouse, connectivity and battery life are the most important factors. Most wireless mice offer amazing battery life, but some of the best gaming mice have also integrated wireless charging technology into their gaming mice, meaning you never have to worry about losing power while gaming. And with giants like Razer and Logitech behind the helm, we're seeing some amazing variety in terms of form factor and customizability as well.

You'll also want to look at the type of sensor the mouse uses in terms of its DPI as this will dictate how precise your mouse can be. Another factor to consider is the ecosystem the mouse belongs to as well. With the number of 3rd party applications to keep tabs on your games and peripherals getting larger by the day, adding another to the growing pile is something most of us would prefer to avoid. 

Wireless peripherals can be an awesome addition to any gaming setup provided you're willing to spend the cash. If you're looking to cut the cord, but don't want to stretch your budget, make sure to know what Black Friday deals to expect so you don't overspend.   View Deal

Clean is the new cool, so if you're looking for more ways to cut cords out of your life, make sure to check out our guide to the best wireless gaming keyboard so you can nail that minimalist battlestation look you've been striving for. 

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(Image credit: Logitech)


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1. Logitech G502 Lightspeed wireless

The best wireless mouse

DPI: 16,000 | Sensor: Optical HERO 16K | Battery: 40+ hours rechargeable | Interface: USB | Buttons: 11 | Ergonomic: Right-handed | Weight: 114 g (0.25 lbs)

Tons of macros
Excellent design
Adjustable weight
Pricey
Aggressive form factor

Ousting the versatile G903, the G502 Lightspeed Wireless is the latest iteration of a long-standing favorite for Logitech veterans, the G502 Proteus Spectrum, and has gone through a bit of an evolution rather than revolution over the years. Initially being upgraded with a 16K DPI sensor, Logitech took the next logical step by pairing this beast of a gaming mouse with its PowerPlay technology, allowing it to remain constantly charged and connected. Even without the PowerPlay mat, the G502 can remain functional for more than 40 hours on a single charge.

Not a single feature was removed to make room for this convenience. Everything that made the original G502 great is present here, from its adjustable 16g weights to its unlocked mouse wheel and 11 buttons. While its aggressive batmobile aesthetic may not appeal to everyone, the performance of this mouse is second to none.

While the G903 remains an excellent alternative, especially for southpaw shooters, the added customizability and macros let the G502 inch ahead of the competition, but just barely.

The wireless version of this venerable warhorse is the spitting image of its ancestors and the pinnacle of uncompromising performance when it comes to wireless gaming mice.  

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2. Razer Mamba / Firefly Hyperflux

The best wirelessly charging mouse

CPI: 16,000 | Sensor: Optical 5G | Battery: Internal rechargeable | Interface: USB | Buttons: 9 | Ergonomic: Right Handed | Weight: 96 g (0.21 lbs)

Simple
Precise optical sensor
Light compared to its peers
More expensive than most wired gaming mice
Fewer buttons

Razer broke into the wireless charging game with its Hyperflux technology, pairing it with crowd favorites the Mamba wireless mouse and Firefly RGB mousepad. This technology is virtually indistinguishable from the Powerplay tech used in Logitech peripherals, providing a constant source of power and connectivity for your mouse. 

The Mamba and Firefly Hyperflux remain essentially unchanged from their conventional cousins, the Mamba still sports a total on 9 button inputs and a 5G 16K DPI sensor. While the Firefly has interchangeable cloth and smooth plastic surfaces surrounded by RGB lighting that can be customized with Razer's Synapse software.

The Mamba Hyperflux differs from other wireless mice in that it lacks an onboard battery, meaning it can only last a short time when separated from its power source. However, this makes the Mamba considerably lighter than other wireless mice, weighing in at a mere 96g.

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3. Logitech G305

A great, affordable gaming mouse

CPI: 12,000 | Sensor: Optical Hero | Battery: 250 hours, AA **Interface:** USB | Buttons: 6 | Ergonomic: Ambidextrous (left-side thumb buttons) | Weight: 99 g (0.22 lbs)

Amazingly light, with solid build quality
Logitech's best sensor in an affordable body
Fewer features than a high-end mouse

The Logitech G502 above has a peerless design, but it isn't affordable for everyone. With the newer G305, Logitech tried to make a high-performance wireless gaming mouse for everyone. At a midrange price, it's competing directly against some great wired mice, but there are no real compromises here in terms of performance or design. The G305 uses Logitech's newest Hero sensor, an iteration on the fantastic performing sensor in the G502. It can last more than 200 hours on a single AA battery (which helps keep cost down vs. being rechargeable). The small wireless dongle can be stored inside the body of the mouse, but critically, the left- and right-click buttons are separate pieces from the removable palmrest, ensuring a reliable and satisfying click.

The shape of the G305 is based on a small, ambidextrous design Logitech has been using for years, and they haven't messed with a good thing. While components like the scroll wheel and buttons don't feel quite as premium as the ones in the G903, they're still far better than anything you'll find in a cheap gaming mouse. The quality and performance of the G305 are killer for the price.

Read more about it here.

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4. E-Blue Mazer II

A dirt cheap wireless gaming mouse

CPI: 2,500 | Sensor: Optical Avago 5090 | Battery: Months, 2xAA **Interface:** USB | Buttons: 6 | Ergonomic: Right-handed | Weight: 140 g (0.31 lbs)

Seriously, it's cheap
Not a great sensor
No driver software
Cheaper build quality

It’s amazing what twenty dollars can get you. Budget gaming brand E-Blue makes a variety of wired and wireless gaming mice, and the Mazer II is a decent wireless mouse for about 20 bucks. Still, I wouldn't recommend anyone in the market for a mouse go this cheap: you'll get a much better sensor with a wired mouse for just a bit more money, and much better performance, battery life, and software with a high-end wireless mouse like the Logitech G502. But if you're dead set on wireless and only have a few dollars to spend, the Mazer II is a good choice.

The Mazer II has four DPI options, from 500 to 2500, and a comfortable enough left-hand grip (even if the materials are on the cheaper side). Don't expect any driver software with the Mazer II, or the kind of performance you can get out of typical gaming mice, which have polling rates of 1000 Hz, meaning they communicate with your PC every millisecond. The Mazer II only offers a 250 Hz polling rate. Now, will you ever notice that difference? That depends on how sensitive you are to the responsiveness of your mouse cursor. For most people, those few milliseconds won't offer a noticeable delay. 

While I didn't have any wireless performance issues with the Mazer II, don't expect its signal to be as strong as what you get with a Logitech or Razer mouse. In a "noisy" wireless environment, you could end up experiencing some interference. But hey, that's why it's cheap.

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5. Logitech MX Vertical

The best productivity mouse is also suitable for most games

CPI: 2,500 | Sensor: Optical | Battery: Up to four months **Interface:** USB, Bluetooth | Buttons: 6 | Ergonomic: Right-handed, vertical | Weight: 135 g (0.31 lbs)

Incredibly comfortable and ergonomic
Virtually no lag or latency
Reduces strain and fatigue
Awkward thumb buttons
Not suitable for twitch games

The MX Vertical is one of the best and most comfortable mice I've ever gotten my hands on; it's only this far down the list because it's not designed to be a dedicated gaming mouse. With a high resolution 4,000 CPI, it's certainly sensitive enough to be used in most gaming applications, particularly strategy games or sims where fast movements or insane precision aren't required, but it does lag behind the 12,000 or 16,000 CPI sensors you find in a lot of modern gaming mice. 

The MX Vertical's strength is its ergonomic design, molded to allow you to rest your hand in a neutral position. After weeks of use, the lingering aches (and crackling joints) in my right hand had subsided significantly, and it's become my primary mouse at work. Even playing a few rounds of Apex Legends, I found the MX Vertical perfectly competent, though I'm sure eSports pros would disdain it for serious competition. But for productivity and most gaming scenarios, the Vertical is an awesome pointer, one of the best money can buy, and generally available right around the $80 mark, a bargain at that price.

How we test wireless gaming mice

Today, most of the common wisdom about wireless gaming mice is outdated. Some wireless mice are still more expensive, and poor ones could suck their batteries dry in the middle of a match or lag thanks to a poor wireless receiver. But good wireless gaming mice today perform almost indistinguishably from wired ones, without a hint of wireless lag or stutter to be found. To test wireless gaming mice, I got my hands on current models from big names like Logitech, Razer, and SteelSeries. I also scoured Amazon to find other popular wireless gaming mice, most of which are budget models.

I used each wireless gaming mouse for several days, at minimum, getting a sense for how the mouse felt in my hand, the grip and material, and the feel of its buttons. I paid attention to battery life and how often the mouse needed to be recharged if it was rechargeable.

For gaming, I primarily test mice with Destiny 2 and Apex Legends, as well as twitchier shooters like Quake Champions to see how my performance stacks up against other mice. I scrutinize the cursor movement and responsiveness for lag, jitter, and other issues.

I used each mouse with its wireless receiver plugged into my keyboard or sitting on my desk, giving it the best possible wireless situation to work with. I also tested them with their wireless receivers plugged into my tower a few feet away with my legs in between, increasing the opportunity for lag and interference.