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GTA 5 system requirements: What you need to run it on PC

PC building guides

Need a new PC for GTA 5? Check out our build guides: 

Budget gaming PC (opens in new tab)
(~$750/£750) - A good entry-level system.
Mid-range gaming PC (opens in new tab)
(~$1,000/£1,000) - Our recommended build for most gamers.
High-end gaming PC (opens in new tab)
(~$2,000/£2,000) - Everything a gamer could want.
Extreme gaming PC (opens in new tab)
(>$3,000/£3,000) - You won the lotto and are going all-in on gaming.

Prefer to buy a prebuilt than building it yourself? Check out our guide to the Best Gaming PCs.

If your PC is less than five years old, the Grand Theft Auto 5 system requirements shouldn't be daunting. GTA 5 released on PC in 2015, and if you're not loading it down with graphics mods (opens in new tab) and are willing to tweak some settings, you should be able to get it running well on modest hardware.

The recommend graphics card back in 2015 was a GeForce GTX 660,  which manages an average of 33.5 fps at 1080p max settings according to UserBenchmark (opens in new tab). If you want over 60 fps at max settings, a GeForce RTX 2060 or AMD RX 5600 XT will easily handle the task, hitting 70-plus. Performance from previous-generation cards will vary depending on the quality of the card.

Here's what Rockstar says you'll need to enjoy GTA 5's brand of violence and mayhem:

Minimum Specs

  • Processor: Intel Core 2 Quad CPU Q6600 @ 2.40GHz (4 CPUs) / AMD Phenom 9850 Quad-Core Processor (4 CPUs) @ 2.5GHz
  • Memory: 4GB
  • Video Card: NVIDIA 9800 GT 1GB / AMD HD 4870 1GB (DX 10, 10.1, 11)
  • Sound Card: 100% DirectX 10 compatible
  • HDD Space: 72GB

Recommended Specs

  • Processor: Intel Core i5 3470 @ 3.2GHZ (4 CPUs) / AMD X8 FX-8350 @ 4GHZ (8 CPUs)
  • Memory: 8GB
  • Video Card: NVIDIA GTX 660 2GB / AMD HD7870 2GB
  • Sound Card: 100% DirectX 10 compatible
  • HDD Space: 72GB

If you're low on SSD space, the size of the install could be an issue—at launch, GTA 5 required 65GB but now requires 72GB. That's probably because GTA Online (opens in new tab) has expanded loads since the game's original PC launch, with Smuggler's Run, The Doomsday Heist and more, adding tons more vehicles, missions and even a new radio station to the game. 

Otherwise, you should be good to go even with a modest build. If you struggle to hit your desired framerate, though, try lowering Post FX quality, shader quality, and/or shadow quality a notch.

If you're new to GTA 5 and want to know what to expect, check out our original GTA 5 review. We've also got some GTA 5 cheats (opens in new tab) that'll help in a pinch. And if you're getting into multiplayer, here's our guide on how to make money in GTA Online (opens in new tab). If you're looking forward what's next, read up on every GTA 6 (opens in new tab) rumor to date, all in one place.

(opens in new tab)

GTA 6 (opens in new tab): All the rumors
GTA 5 mods (opens in new tab): Revved up
GTA 5 cheats (opens in new tab): Phone it in
San Andreas cheats (opens in new tab): All the codes

Phil Savage
Editor-in-Chief

Phil has been writing for PC Gamer for nearly a decade, starting out as a freelance writer covering everything from free games to MMOs. He eventually joined full-time as a news writer, before moving to the magazine to review immersive sims, RPGs and Hitman games. Now he leads PC Gamer's UK team, but still sometimes finds the time to write about his ongoing obsessions with Destiny 2, GTA Online and Apex Legends. When he's not levelling up battle passes, he's checking out the latest tactics game or dipping back into Guild Wars 2. He's largely responsible for the whole Tub Geralt thing, but still isn't sorry.