Skip to main content

Mythic Quest: Raven's Banquet has already been renewed for a second season

Audio player loading…

Mythic Quest: Raven's Banquet is a faux documentary series about the most popular MMO in the world—the titular Raven's Quest—and the team of developers making it. Nobody's actually seen it yet, outside of the production team and presumably a few folks at Apple TV, because it doesn't debut until February, but even so it's already been renewed for a second season.

The show features an ensemble cast including Academy Award winner F. Murray Abraham, Danny Pudi, Imani Hakim, Charlotte Nicdao, David Hornsby, Ashly Burch and Jessie Ennis, but the central character is Ian Grimm, the egotistical auteur who both leads the studio and stars in the game. Grimm is played by Rob McElhenney, the creator and star of It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia; his Always Sunny compatriots Charlie Day and Mega Ganz are also co-creators of Mythic Quest.

The first trailer for Mythic Quest: Raven's Banquet (that's the one up above) arrived a couple weeks ago, and honestly compels me to admit that I'm not terribly impressed. Maybe I'm too close to the subject matter, but "oblivious dickhead makes people around him miserable" does not strike me as an inherently funny concept. Still, McElhenney and co. have done amazing things with It's Always Sunny, and I'd love to see them pull off something similar here, too.

(Honestly also compels me to admit that I wasn't terribly thrilled with Henry Cavill as Geralt at first either, and look how that turned out.)

The first season of Mythic Quest: Raven's Banquet, consisting of nine half-hour episodes, will debut on Apple TV on February 7.

Andy Chalk

Andy has been gaming on PCs from the very beginning, starting as a youngster with text adventures and primitive action games on a cassette-based TRS80. From there he graduated to the glory days of Sierra Online adventures and Microprose sims, ran a local BBS, learned how to build PCs, and developed a longstanding love of RPGs, immersive sims, and shooters. He began writing videogame news in 2007 for The Escapist and somehow managed to avoid getting fired until 2014, when he joined the storied ranks of PC Gamer. He covers all aspects of the industry, from new game announcements and patch notes to legal disputes, Twitch beefs, esports, and Henry Cavill. Lots of Henry Cavill.