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The Unreal Engine 5 demo is a massive 100GB

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It's no secret game install sizes have been growing steadily over the years but, for the next generation of games, we might need a whole lot more storage space if we want to keep up.

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The Unreal Engine 5 welcome video treated us to a demo of a bunch of cool features set to come with the early 2022 launch (opens in new tab). But development tools and stunning vistas like those shown come at a heavy cost, and storage is one of those areas that's going to be beaten down the hardest.

Game install sizes already take the mickey, with some real mighty storage hogs (opens in new tab) around, and just the demo sample project for UE5, Valley of the Ancient, is 100GB alone. That's not including the 10GB for the engine itself. 

With the ability to directly import assets "comprised of millions of polygons—anything from ZBrush sculpts to photogrammetry scans," and a host of other super intensive features, its fair to say the next wave of games are going to eat deep into that precious SSD storage space. 

Back when Unreal Engine 5 was first announced, we spoke to some developers about their thoughts (opens in new tab) on the engine and one of the prevailing topics that came up was, you guessed it, install sizes.

"The only drawback I see is exponentially increasing the install size of the game," Stephen Kick of Nightdive Studios says, "which even now is nearing 100GB or more for some titles."

Prepare yourselves—we're either going to need racks upon racks of SSDs, or storage solutions are going to have to catch up pretty darn fast.

Katie Wickens
Katie Wickens

Screw sports, Katie would rather watch Intel, AMD and Nvidia go at it. Having been obsessed with computers and graphics for three long decades, she took Game Art and Design up to Masters level at uni, and has been demystifying tech and science—rather sarcastically—for two years since. She can be found admiring AI advancements, scrambling for scintillating Raspberry Pi projects, preaching cybersecurity awareness, sighing over semiconductors, and gawping at the latest GPU upgrades. She's been heading the PCG Steam Deck content hike, while waiting patiently for her chance to upload her consciousness into the cloud.