Gaming hardware

Logitech announces G502 gaming mouse with 12,000 DPI sensor

Wes Fenlon at

Logitech has a new gaming mouse, and that gaming mouse has an edgy name to go with its ridiculous new 12,000 DPI sensor: Proteus Core. Logitech's G502 Proteus Core is the successor to the G500s, which is just a year old. Logitech calls the 12,000 DPI sensor "the world's most powerful and accurate sensor" and say it's a brand new design that no other mouse on the market has.

The DPI race doesn't say much about sensor quality—most gamers use a DPI setting in the low thousands, and no one can realistically control a mouse at 1200 DPI—but Logitech claims the sensor has "zero acceleration, zero smoothing or filtering, and zero pixel rounding." Those are all magic words to hardcore gamers worried about mouse acceleration throwing off their aim. The Proteus Core's big new feature is the ability to calibrate the sensor on different surfaces to optimize tracking and lift-off distance


Nvidia Shield update adds official PC streaming, console mode, more Android support

Patrick Carlson at

With the Nvidia Shield's PC streaming function now out of its beta phase, the handheld's latest update should bring more flexibility to an already innovative device. The machine's new patch also introduces a new console mode and increased gamepad support for touch-screen games, alongside Android 4.3, according to a press release today.


CES 2013: what does it mean for PC gaming?

Tom Senior at

The Consumer Electronics Show has hit full stride in Vegas this week. Huge amounts of mobile and tablet tech are flying around at the moment, but in between the techno-babble and nonsensical corporate catchphrases like LG's "touch the smart life" there are a few kooky bits of PC news. There's the Valve-endorsed living room box, big touchscreen PCs designed to lie flat on your coffee table, eye tracking tech and more. So what does the future hold for PC tech this year? Here's a quick overview of some of the PC trends we've seen so far at CES 2013.


What are your favourite PC gaming peripherals?

Adam Oxford at

The one thing we don't review enough of in the PC Gamer hardware pages is game controllers. A fair number of wheels and joysticks with nasty plastic cases and pseudo rumble reactions pass through The Labs, but very few of the old fashioned, real-world simulation kits which used to be a stalwart of PC gaming get strapped to the test bench these days.

Partly, this is because gaming tastes have changed and the sims that require this gear aren't as popular as they were – it's been five years since the last Flight Sim, for example. Partly it's because there just aren't as many industrial strength peripherals around any more, and what there is can be very niche and usable only by the kind of sim fans who already have a real helicopter pilot's licence.