Best 4K gaming monitors in 2024

The best 4K gaming monitor can make way more than games look great. It's a big upgrade to any system that can showcase its potential. Games in particular make the best argument for the swap to 4K, highlighting just how vivid modern graphics can look at high resolution.

Right now, the best 4K gaming monitor is the Asus ROG Swift OLED PG32UCDM. With a gorgeous OLED panel delivering a crisp 4K resolution—it just makes so much sense to a PC gamer. The LG UltraGear 27GR93U is our favorite non-OLED 4K gaming monitor. It's got the best IPS panel, is supremely well-calibrated, and easily stands out above the rest of the pack. 

You'll want a top-end GPU like the RTX 4080 Super to get the most from a 4K monitor; however, with tweaked settings, even cards lower down the stack like the RTX 4070 can output reasonable results at 4K.

Curated by...
Dave James
Curated by...
Dave James

Dave's been testing monitors for so long, he can spot a good one from a mile away. He's reviewed all types and sorts, shapes and sizes, and as a result he's the person best qualified to guide you into your next 4K monitor purchase. Whether you're looking for a huge TV replacement, a console players dream, or simply something fantastic looking to take pride of place on your desk, Dave's got you covered.

The quick list

Recent updates

This guide was updated on May 3 to add the Asus ROG Swift OLED PG32UCDM as the best 4K gaming monitor.

The best 4K gaming monitor

The best 4K gaming monitor

Specifications

Screen size: 32-inch
Panel type: QD-OLED
Aspect ratio: 16:9
Resolution: 3840 x 2160
Response time: 0.03 ms
Refresh rate: 240 Hz
Weight: 19.40 lbs (8.8 kg)
Refresh rate technology: AMD FreeSync Premium Pro, G-Sync Compatibility

Reasons to buy

+
Stunning OLED panel
+
4K pixel density
+
240Hz refresh

Reasons to avoid

-
Full-screen brightness still limited
-
Very expensive
Buy if...

✅ You demand high pixel density: This was the first 4K OLED we experienced, but it's also the best. The high resolution for the screen size also helps reduce a problem affecting all OLED monitors to varying degrees: text fringing.

Don't buy if...

❌ You can't hack low full-screen brightness: Like every other OLED monitor, full-screen brightness remains lower than many other non-OLED high-end gaming monitors.

The Asus ROG Swift OLED PG32UCDM earns our pick as the best OLED gaming monitor with its crisp and gorgeous 4K picture.

Fit with a sparkling new QD-OLED panel from Samsung, the PG32UCDM is the best of the new second wave of OLED gaming monitors recently released. It just beats out the Alienware 32 AW3225QF, and the Gigabyte Aorus FO32U2 couldn't match the calibration and quality of the ROG Swift.

The PG32UCDM wields its OLED panel well. It almost goes without saying with a QD-OLED, but the contrast is absurdly impressive and the vibrancy through the roof. The exact configuration of this ROG Swift model is spot-on, too, and more favorable than the cooler calibration we've experienced on the Aorus FO32U2.

It's absolutely at its best when displaying scenes with a mix of dark and light elements. This monitor is equal or better than any other in this regard. Like any other OLED gaming monitor, it does struggle more with extremely bright scenes; but the glossy coating does help to make up for some of our qualms with brightness overall. Realistically, if you haven't used an OLED gaming monitor previously and then you use this, you're going to be blown away.

A 4K monitor, the PG32UCDM offers a superb pixel density, which helps alleviate issues we've had with non-4K OLED panels and text fringing, which is caused by an odd sub-pixel layout. The same pixel layout is common across this and other 4K models, but the higher quantity of pixels helps make it much less noticeable.

You will need a powerful graphics card to maximise the PG32UCDM's full 4K, 240 Hz specification. That's high-end RTX 40-series or RX 7900-series territory, otherwise you might not get anywhere close in more demanding modern games. That said, competitive games will run great on this monitor, helped along by both the 0.03 ms response time and support for both FreeSync and G-Sync variable refresh rate technologies.

The PG32UCDM's build might not be to everyone's taste with the obnoxious red lighting beaming underneath the triple-legged stand, but you cannot fault it for quality. Importantly, the screen includes a custom heatsink within that black surround.

Overall, the ROG Swift OLED PG32UCDM is the OLED gaming monitor to beat today, and if you have the budget to buy one, you will not be disappointed.

Read our full Asus ROG Swift OLED PG32UCDM review.

The best non-OLED 4K gaming monitor

The best non-OLED 4K gaming monitor

Specifications

Screen size: 27-inch
Panel type: IPS
Aspect ratio: 16:9
Resolution: 3840 x 2160
Response time: 1 ms
Refresh rate: 144 Hz
Weight: 14.1 lbs | 6.4 kg
Refresh rate technology: FreeSync Premium | G-SYNC Compatible

Reasons to buy

+
Gorgeous 4K IPS Panel
+
Excellent calibration
+
Very, very fast

Reasons to avoid

-
A bit too expensive
-
Not a proper HDR panel
-
Build quality is a bit cheap
Buy if...

✅ You want a fast and vivid 4K screen: LG makes some of the best IPS panels for monitors and the one here is absolutely top-notch.

Don't buy if...

You expect a bit of luxury for this kind of money: It's not super expensive but even so, it's not packed with features or premium materials.

The LG UltraGear 27GR93U is the best overall 4K gaming monitor, thanks to its stunning IPS panel that's beautifully calibrated right out the box. The combination of 4K and 27 inches results in a perfect pixel density, making it great for productivity tasks and the colour accuracy is ideal for content creation.

It's greatest strength, though, is in gaming. The pixel response time and 144 Hz G-SYNC Compatible variable refresh rate will suit almost all genres. The LG offers excellent clarity, even under very fast motion, which makes it a great pick for competitive shooters or anything that requires twitchy mouse movements.

In terms of connection options, you get two 48Gbps HMDI 2.1 ports and a DisplayPort 1.4 connection, which makes it ideal for consoles and gaming PCs. It's HDR capabilities are limited to DisplayHDR 400, but the panel still does a great job of displaying SDR content in HDR mode.

The downsides are the high MSRP (around $630/AU$999), though it's often on sale for a lot less, the relative lack of additional features, and the overall level of quality. Not the panel, as that's outstanding, but things like the stand and the plastics used for the body. Even the rear RGB lighting is nothing special.

However, LG sensibly chose to focus all its efforts on ensuring the panel itself is second to none in the 4K monitor sector. It really is a stunning display, with rich colours, great contrast, and superb pixel accuracy. The Ultragear 27GR93U could well be the best overall 4K gaming monitor for a good while, as it will take an awful lot to beat this.

Read our full LG UltraGear 27GR93U review.

The best budget 4K gaming monitor

The best affordable 4K gaming monitor

Specifications

Screen size: 28-inch
Panel type: IPS
Aspect ratio: 16:9
Resolution: 3840 x 2160
Response time: 2 ms
Refresh rate: 144 Hz
Weight: 15.3 lbs | 6.9 kg
Refresh rate technology: FreeSync Premium

Reasons to buy

+
Affordable 4K
+
144Hz refresh rate
+
Stunning IPS panel
+
Great for 4K gaming

Reasons to avoid

-
Cheap stand
-
Overdrive often overdoes it
Buy if...

✅ You want high resolution, not a high price: 4K monitors used to be very expensive but not any more. The M28U is very reasonably priced.

Don't buy if...

You want an ultra-fast screen: It's not slow but activating the pixel overdrive to get even higher response times just adds image artefacts.

The best affordable 4K gaming monitor is the Gigabyte M28U for one very simple reason: it's a great display and doesn't cost a small fortune, like 4K monitors used to just a few years ago.

Its 28-inch IPS panel has exceptional colour depth and clarity. Black levels are very impressive, despite having a fairly low contrast ratio. As with many IPS gaming monitors these days, the M28U is rated to DisplayHDR 400 but it isn't a display you'd pick for HDR content. Certain games, like Cyberpunk 2077 will look fine, but that's about it.

Really cheap 4K monitors typically have fixed refresh rates of 60 Hz, but here you're getting 144 Hz with support for AMD's FreeSync Premium. Thanks to the presence of two HDMI 2.1 ports, it's a great option for PlayStation 5 and Xbox Series X owners, though PC gamers will want to stick with the DisplayPort 1.4 connection.

The pixel response is more than fast enough for most users, at 1 ms grey-to-grey (GtG), but the overdrive function isn't worth using, as it adds image artefacts as it tries to reduce ghosting.

As for downsides, Gigabyte obviously had to cut some corners in the M28U to get the price down, and the quality of the plastics and limited adjustability of the stand are the clearest examples of this. And you could argue that it would be a better monitor if the panel was 27 inches in size, as it would help to improve the pixel density.

But these are very minor issues when you take the monitor as a whole. You're getting an awful lot of fast, high-resolution screen, for a price that's very affordable for this segment.

Read our full Gigabyte M28U review.

The best 32-inch 4K gaming monitor

The best 32-inch 4K gaming monitor

Specifications

Screen size: 32-inch
Panel type: IPS
Aspect ratio: 16:9
Resolution: 3840 x 2160
Response time: 2 ms
Refresh rate: 144 Hz (160 Hz overclocked)
Weight: 15.3 lbs | 6.9 kg
Refresh rate technology: FreeSync Premium

Reasons to buy

+
Affordable 4K
+
Up to 160Hz refresh overclocked
+
Great panel performance
+
No frills approach
+
Handy USB hub

Reasons to avoid

-
Stand is pretty basic
-
DisplayHDR 400 isn't much
Buy if...

✅ You want a large 4K screen: While most 4K monitors tend to be 27-inch, sometimes that's just not quite big enough. No worries on that front here.

Don't buy if...

You want a proper HDR experience: As with all IPS panels, the dark colours and peak brightness just aren't good enough to get a proper HDR image.

Sometimes, all you want is a really big screen to give you lots of real estate to work and play on, and the best 32-inch 4K monitor for this role is the Gigabyte M32UC.

Just like that in its smaller cousin, the M28U, the IPS panel is luscious and vibrant, with a fast pixel response and high 144 Hz refresh rate. It's not ideal for HDR content, as its DisplayHDR 400 rating is the lowest level of certification, but it's more than good enough for everything else.

The extra size helps make room for additional connectivity and there's no shortage here: a DisplayPort 1.4 connection, two HDMI 2.1, one USB Type-C, three USB 3.2 Type-A, one USB 3.2 Upstream, and a 3.5 mm jack for your headphones. All this makes it a great all-rounder for anyone wanting a monitor that's ideal for gaming and working from home.

In the case of the latter, the panel's size means the pixel density isn't very high, so you'll need to use a bit of desktop scaling to keep icons and text clear. And the 1500R curvature won't be to everyone's taste, especially for those who do a lot of productivity tasks.

Other than the chassis being very bland to look, there's little to complain about here and even the stand is a decent affair. Best of all, it's priced very reasonably, and most monitors this size are either way more expensive or just aren't suitable for gaming.

While we'd still recommend the M28U for most users, those of you wanting an impressively big screen to fill your vision should head for the Gigabyte M32UC instead.

Read our full Gigabyte M32UC review.

The best 4K gaming monitor for console

The best 4K gaming monitor for console

Specifications

Screen size: 27-inch
Panel type: Nano IPS
Aspect ratio: 16:9
Resolution: 3840 x 2160
Response time: 5 ms GtG
Refresh rate: 144 Hz
Weight: 14.8 lbs | 6.7 kg
Refresh rate technology: FreeSync Premium Pro | G-SYNC Compatible

Reasons to buy

+
Excellent design
+
Fantastic LG IPS panel
+
Broad connectivity options

Reasons to avoid

-
Poor HDR and local dimming
-
High sticker price
Buy if...

✅ You don't have room for a big 4K TV: This is the perfect way to enjoy next-gen gaming on your console, thanks to its high resolution and refresh rate.

Don't buy if...

You don't want to spend big TV money on a monitor: There's no escaping the fact that this is an expensive display but at least you're getting a high quality product.

Dough might be a relative newcomer in the monitor market, but its Spectrum One Glossy is certainly the best 4K monitor for console gaming. What sets this apart from the others is that you can plug it directly into a PlayStation 5 or Xbox Series X and instantly enjoy 4K, variable 144 Hz gaming, all with beautiful, bright colours.

Of course, the other monitors we recommend can do this too, but Dough has worked on improving console combability through firmware updates, whereas other vendors are more focused on the PC sector. It's work perfectly fine on any desktop computer or laptop, but it gets to show its best side on a console.

For IPS panel, the black colours and contrast are exceptional, and probably the best we've seen outside of the realm of OLED panels. Active the pixel overdrive setting and you'll be treated to fast response times, with absolutely no hint of ghosting.

As with all monitors, though, it's not perfect. Gaming in HDR isn't very nice, as light tends to bleed into dark regions, which is not what you'd expect for something that's rated to DisplayHDR 600. So stick to SDR mode and all will be lovely.

The Dough Spectrum One can be ordered with a glossy or matte finish to the panel, and it's the former you absolutely want. However, if you want a stand to be shipped with the monitor, you'll need to pay out more monitor, which is a very silly affair given that the competition all include one in the price.

Quirks aside, console games do look glorious on the Spectrum One. If only all IPS panels were this nice.

Read our full Dough Spectrum Glossy review.

The best 4K TV replacement

The best 4K TV replacement

Specifications

Screen size: 48-inch
Panel type: OLED
Aspect ratio: 16:9
Response time: 1 ms GtG
Resolution: 3840 x 2160
Refresh rate: 138 Hz
Weight: 33 lbs | 15 kg
Refresh rate technology: FreeSync | G-SYNC Compatible

Reasons to buy

+
OLED for deep blacks
+
Fast response and high refresh
+
42-inch is the best large desktop size
+
Impressive array of ports and features
+
G-Sync compatible

Reasons to avoid

-
Low pixel density & text color fringing
-
OLED = risk of burn in
-
No height or swivel adjustment
-
42-inch LG C2 is cheaper with similar performance
Buy if...

✅ You want a massive monitor for your gaming rig: At 42 inches in size, the Asus PG42UQ LG makes some of the best IPS panels for monitors and the one here is absolutely top-notch.

Don't buy if...

You're hoping to use it for more than gaming and media: Low pixel density, text fringing, and the risk of OLED burn-in doesn't make this ideal for desktop work.

Not everyone hunkers down in front of a small monitor to enjoy a spot of PC gaming, as there plenty of folks who hook their rigs up to a TV, so they can sit back and relax. And the best 4K TV replacement monitor is the Asus ROG Swift PG42UQ.

As TVs go, it's a long way off being the largest you can get, at 'just' 42 inches in size, but as a monitor, it's mind-bogglingly big. But why would you pick this over a normal TV? Very few offer the combination of 4K, variable 144 Hz refresh rate, and ultra-low pixel response times.

And none will offer a DisplayPort 1.4 connection, let alone two 48Gbps HDMI 2.1 and two two HDMI 2.0 ports, along with four 10Gbps USB Type-A sockets. It's as gaming focused as you could possibly want, being ideal for PC and consoles.

The OLED panel products wonderfully deep blacks and vividly rich colours, and while it's not the brightest you can get, HDR gaming is a sublime experience on the RG42UQ.

Just don't sit too close to it, as the huge size means the pixel density is very low and there's a fair amount of colour fringing around text. There's no height or swivel adjustment to the stand, of course, though there is a small degree of tilt available. But this is designed to be set down in a room and never to be moved again, just like any TV.

And that's because it essentially is a TV, as it uses the same panel as in LG's C9 range, and even includes a decent set of speakers and sub-woofer. Unfortunately, all the extra PC-related features add to the price, and it's very expensive for a monitor, with an MSRP of $1,400/AU$2,199.

But if you want a seriously huge monitor and you're willing to accept the drawbacks of OLED, then there's little to touch it in this segment.

Read our full Asus ROG Swift PG42UQ review.

The best ultrawide 4K gaming monitor

The best 4K ultrawide

Specifications

Screen size: 57-inch
Panel type: VA (mini-LED)
Aspect ratio: 32:9
Resolution: 7680 x 2160
Response time: 1 ms GtG
Refresh rate: 240 Hz
Weight: 42 lbs | 19 kg
Refresh rate technology: FreeSync

Reasons to buy

+
More pixels than you can possibly imagine
+
Much improved local dimming
+
Staggering gaming experience

Reasons to avoid

-
Mini-LED tech still has limitations
-
Ergonomics are questionable
-
Quite, er, expensive
Buy if...

✅ You want two 4K monitors in one: Samsung markets this as an 8K/dual UHD screen but it's better to think of it as two high res displays in one handy but bulky package.

Don't buy if...

You don't have an enormous computer desk: The G95NC is Jurassic-era big and heavy, and it'll utterly dominate most desks.

4K monitors are so useful for productivity and content creation that many PC enthusiasts often have two of them. And that's literally what Samsung has done for the best 4K ultrawide monitor, by stitching two 4K panels together to make one humongous screen.

With a combined resolution of 7680 x 2160, you could argue that's not a 4K monitor and Samsung certainly agrees, as it markets the G95NC as an 8K/dual UHD display. However, since the vertical resolution is the same as any other 4K panel, it doesn't really feel like it's higher than this.

That is until you start gaming on it. While it's one of the very few monitors available that offers a DisplayPort 2.1 connection, you really need a top-end graphics card in order to push all those pixels around fast enough. A GeForce RTX 4090 can, though its DP output only supports a refresh rate of 120 Hz at 8K.

But if you have such a card, then you're in for a treat, because until you've experienced gaming on a 57-inch monitor, all wrapped around you with a tight 1000R curvature, you've not seen just what's possible in graphics.

The two VA panels are backlit by mini-LEDs and while it doesn't have the highest of contrast ratios, it's still very impressive. HDR gaming is really good, thanks to the DisplayHDR 1000 rating, though we'd still take an OLED monitor for HDR content.

Samsung's monster monitor is surprisingly adept at being used in productivity and content creation tasks, although the curved panels means you'll be cranking your head around more than you'd like.

However, the Neo G9 G95NC's heart is in gaming. It's not just ultrawide, it's ultra-big, ultra-immersive, ultra-heavy, ultra-expensive. Ultra-gaming, if there's such a phrase.

Read our full Samsung Odyssey Neo G9 G95NC review.

Best 4K gaming monitor FAQ

Is a 4K gaming monitor worth it for PC gaming?

The biggest thing to consider is whether you have a PC capable of making a 4K gaming monitor worth it. Upgrading to one of the best graphics cards will ensure your machine will not just be rendering a gaming slideshow with the step-up to 4K. It would help if you also aimed for a larger screen size too. These new 4K gaming monitors now come in higher than 60Hz refresh rates to accommodate the higher frames these new GPUs can generate. 

How do we test 4K gaming monitors?

There are two main ways to test a screen to determine whether it's the best gaming monitor material. The first is by playing games on it. Subjectively testing the gaming performance of each panel isn’t necessarily going to give you the lowdown on the specifics of a particular screen. Still, it will let you test the functioning aspect ratio, native resolution, and any specific gamer-centric technologies they’re sporting.

Side-by-side comparative testing in this manner is also precious for keying into the sometimes subtle differences between each panel. When you use a screen in isolation, it’s easy to become blind to its comparative faults as you get used to them. Testing screens back-to-back allows us to discover and highlight specific issues between them.

We also use a heap of standardized tests produced by Lagom to ensure levels and saturation are visually up to our standards.

Should I go for an IPS, TN, VA, or OLED panel?

We would always recommend an IPS panel over TN. The clarity of image, viewing angle, and colour reproduction are all far superior to the cheaper technology, but you'll often find a faster TN for cheaper. VA tech is the other alternative, less expensive than IPS and better than TN. The colours aren't hot, but the contrast performance is impressive. OLEDs offer incredible colour contrast and speedy response times but aren't as bright as their TV counterparts. 

Should I go for a FreeSync or G-Sync monitor?

In general, FreeSync monitors will be cheaper. It used to be the case that they would only work in combination with an AMD GPU. The same went for G-Sync monitors and Nvidia GPUs. Nowadays, though, it is possible to find G-Sync compatible FreeSync monitors if you're intent on spending less.

What aspect ratio should I go for?

Today's movies and games are best enjoyed in a widescreen format at a 16:9 aspect ratio or above. In 4:3, those cinematic moments will look stunted with black strips along the top and bottom. There are a host of minute variations on each ratio, but at the end of the day choosing between these depends entirely on your personal preference. 

And the very far-out option, if you have a little extra cash to blow, is ultra-wide aspect ratios like 21:9 and 32:9 and their variants. These will provide a much more immersive, encompassing experience. Or literally, encompass yourself with a curved monitor, up to you.

Plenty of games support these ultrawide resolutions, and while not often full 4K, they do demand nearly as much out of your GPU and deliver a similarly high-fidelity and immersive experience. 

Jargon buster

Refresh Rate (Hz)
The speed at which the screen refreshes. For example, 144 Hz means the display refreshes 144 times a second. The higher the number, the smoother the screen will appear when you play games. 

V-Sync
Graphics tech synchronizes a game's framerate with your monitor's refresh rate to help prevent screen tearing by syncing your GPU frame rate to the display's maximum refresh rate. Turn V-Sync on in your games for a smoother experience, but you'll lose information, so turn it off for fast-paced shooters (and live with the tearing). Useful if you have an older model display that can't keep up with a new GPU.

G-Sync
A frame synching tech that's only for Nvidia GPUs. It allows the monitor to sync up with the GPU, by showing a new frame as soon as the GPU has one ready.

FreeSync
AMD's take on frame synching uses a similar technique as G-Sync, with the biggest difference being that it uses DisplayPort's Adaptive-Sync technology which doesn't cost monitor manufacturers anything.

Ghosting
When movement on your display leaves behind a trail of pixels when watching a movie or playing a game, this is often a result of a monitor having slow response times. 

Response Time
The amount of time it takes a pixel to transition to a new colour and back. Often referenced as G2G or Grey-to-Grey. Slow response times can lead to ghosting. A suitable range for a gaming monitor is between 1-4 milliseconds.

TN Panels
Twisted-nematic is the most common (and cheapest) gaming panel. TN panels tend to have poorer viewing angles and colour reproduction but have higher refresh rates and response times. 

IPS
In-plane switching, panels offer the best contrast and colour despite having weaker blacks. IPS panels tend to be more expensive and have higher response times. 

VA
Vertical Alignment panels provide good viewing angles and have better contrast than even IPS but are still slower than TN panels. They are often a compromise between a TN and IPS panel. 

HDR
High Dynamic Range. HDR provides a wider colour range than normal SDR panels and offers increased brightness. The result is more vivid colours, deeper blacks, and a brighter picture. 

Peak Brightness
This refers to the maximum brightness of a monitor or television and is measured in nits.

Ultrawide
Shorthand for monitors with aspect wider aspect ratios like 32:9 or 21:9

Resolution
The number of pixels that make up a monitor's display, measured by height and width. For example: 1920 x 1080 (aka 1080p), 2560 x 1440 (2K), and 3840 x 2160 (4K).