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    Old 07-20-2012, 08:51 AM
    ED_MyPC ED_MyPC is offline
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    Question A call to gamers! - Do Crowdfunded games have a future?

    I dont know if you are aware of the huge amoun of crowd sourcing/ Crowdfunding platforms opening up all over the internet. But if you have you would have noticed that almost all of them offer project for Games to be financed by its users, Which is exciting right?

    Well for a fan of indie games, it is but it also raises a few questions... is there ever going to be a great game sourced by Crowdfunding? How would it look like? what is needed in order to make this process better?

    IMO, Of course ther will be and i think it's just a matter of time. the best shout at the moment will be Day One/Magrunner from the CF(crowdfunding) Platform Gamesplanet Lab, but i really want to know how people feel about CF?
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    Old 07-20-2012, 10:11 PM
    SSH83 SSH83 is offline
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    The first wave has already come and gone. The future of crowd-funding largely depends on how successful these game are.

    It's extremely high risk because like most other art projects, "getting it just right" can take unforeseen number of retries. With crowd-funding like Kickstarter, if the developers run out of funds and cannot produce a game that meet fan expectation, there will be a huge fall out.

    Of course they can release beta and ask for more funding to polish the game, but it would be on even shakier ground by then.
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    Old 07-21-2012, 08:56 PM
    GrumpyGamerLP GrumpyGamerLP is offline
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    It can be a slippery slope. Minecraft was one instance where it worked. People basically bought the game in alpha and got early access to it. This allowed Notch to continue working on the game. Minecraft, IMHO, is the best value for your money in the history of gaming. I paid $15 for it and played it for hundreds of hours.

    The trend where you pay for a game before it is even in alpha and before there are even screenshots is kind of scary. A shady company could do a kickstarter/panhandle to get money and then never really make the game. They would just have to work on the game enough to give the appearance that they tried. The developer could declare bankruptcy, go out of business and run with the money. The consumer would be screwed.

    I remember when people complained that games were being released before the bugs were worked out. Now people are buying games before they are even made. Buyer beware.
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    Old 07-21-2012, 09:27 PM
    JackRabbit JackRabbit is offline
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    I've said it before, and I will undoubtable say it again. Providing money to the development of a game does not make you a "kickstarter" or a "Crowdfunder" or even a "prepurchaser". It makes you an investor.
    Which in the capitalist society that many of these developers want to live in should mean that any investor is entitled to a cut of any profit.
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    Old 07-22-2012, 05:26 PM
    jedybg jedybg is offline
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    I'm disappointed in most of the crowdfunding titles I've seen.

    Most of them are shallow and depend on a lot of eyecandy to get their userbase. Even though there are a few exceptions, most of the crowdfunded games aren't bad but lack creativity and innovation which is usually the best part of the indie games.
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    Old 07-22-2012, 07:53 PM
    oldschoolgamer oldschoolgamer is offline
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    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JackRabbit View Post
    I've said it before, and I will undoubtable say it again. Providing money to the development of a game does not make you a "kickstarter" or a "Crowdfunder" or even a "prepurchaser". It makes you an investor.
    Which in the capitalist society that many of these developers want to live in should mean that any investor is entitled to a cut of any profit.

    for your tiny investment, you get a game, no where is it said, that you are entiled to a cut of the profits,unless you sign a contract saying so. But honestly, what you have stated is exactly what is wrong with caplitalism, Just because you give someone else a bit of cash and do nothing else, some how you should get the rewards, and it makes you wonder how many people you had to step on to make all that money in the first place. If you want a cut of the profits, i'll bet if you offered one of the kickstarter projects a mill, you might have something to say about being entiled to some of that end game profits.


    to me all this is doing is getting a game that otherwise would never had seen the light of day. You are giving money, in hopes that the game is atleast fun. Consitering none of the first round of kickstarter games have even been finished, (atleast all the ones i have been following) I think people are way too synical about the whole process.

    If investing in a little hope for what could be a great game. If that is to much to ask from that indivdual, don't invest. Just hope enough people do so you can decide at a later date if the game is right for you.

    People blow 25 bucks on dinner, or a movie, or just gas to run around town just for the hella it. Heck instead of buying a shirt for 20 bucks, they buy one for 50 cause it has a label that some think makes it better. (even though you can get the same shirt, made in the same factory in many cases, just minus a tag). But some how if you spend 25 bucks on a game, if it isnt the best thing since sliced bread it is a travesty.



    How about waiting till a good 5 or 10 of these kickstarter games are finished, and perhaps how they support them after the 1.0 version before we start trashing the entire process.
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    Old 07-24-2012, 08:10 AM
    ED_MyPC ED_MyPC is offline
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    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SSH83 View Post
    The first wave has already come and gone. The future of crowd-funding largely depends on how successful these game are.

    It's extremely high risk because like most other art projects, "getting it just right" can take unforeseen number of retries. With crowd-funding like Kickstarter, if the developers run out of funds and cannot produce a game that meet fan expectation, there will be a huge fall out.

    Of course they can release beta and ask for more funding to polish the game, but it would be on even shakier ground by then.
    I think you are completely right; The reputation of this game will set the expectations of the market and under the "artsy" labels, there is going to be plenty of criticism from almost all sections of supporters but from a customer point of view, who only wants to play the gamme and has spend less than £30, It's just as risky as pre ordering a normal game... a glorified pre order if you want, but with the potential to be great thing i think that is bound to compensate the risk. no?
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    Old 07-24-2012, 09:45 PM
    Bungo Bungo is offline
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    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JackRabbit View Post
    I've said it before, and I will undoubtable say it again. Providing money to the development of a game does not make you a "kickstarter" or a "Crowdfunder" or even a "prepurchaser". It makes you an investor.
    Which in the capitalist society that many of these developers want to live in should mean that any investor is entitled to a cut of any profit.
    The legal and regulatory costs of classifying everyone as an investor would likely be prohibitive for the majority of these titles, hence they really are kickstarters rather than investors as they cannot share in the profits.
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    Old 07-24-2012, 10:04 PM
    Daniel Daniel is offline
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    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JackRabbit View Post
    I've said it before, and I will undoubtable say it again. Providing money to the development of a game does not make you a "kickstarter" or a "Crowdfunder" or even a "prepurchaser". It makes you an investor.
    Which in the capitalist society that many of these developers want to live in should mean that any investor is entitled to a cut of any profit.
    Well as long as the donator is aware that they will not make any money back what is the problem. It's more a form of donation rather than making money.
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