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RollerCoaster Tycoon 3 is returning this month with a new edition

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RollerCoaster Tycoon 3 launched 16 years ago, and this month it's getting a new edition. RollerCoaster Tycoon 3: Complete Edition isn't quite a remaster, but it will come with a number of enhancements and widescreen support. It will also be the first time since 2018 that the game has been for sale. 

Developer Frontier and publisher Atari do not have the best relationship, and there have been multiple lawsuits connected to the game. Following a lawsuit where Frontier accused Atari of not paying enough royalties (opens in new tab), it was pulled from GOG and Steam, with Atari citing "expiring rights". 

Judging by the imminent arrival of this new version, the rights seem to have been passed to Frontier, but it's not clear why the classic version of the game still hasn't returned. On Steam (opens in new tab), there's still a page for it, but there's no option to purchase it and the publisher is still listed as Atari. I've reached out to Frontier to find out if they'll also be returning at some point. 

Frontier says the Complete Edition will feature visual improvements, optimised controls and widescreen support, but no 4K, unfortunately. It will also include both the Soaked and Wild expansions, netting you more than 300 rides, 500 bits of scenery, 60 shops and 20 critters. It's also coming to Switch. 

RollerCoaster Tycoon 3: Complete Edition launches on September 24, and you'll be able to grab it on Steam and the Epic Games Store.

Fraser Brown
Fraser Brown

Fraser is the UK online editor and has actually met The Internet in person. With over a decade of experience, he's been around the block a few times, serving as a freelancer, news editor and prolific reviewer. Strategy games have been a 30-year-long obsession, from tiny RTSs to sprawling political sims, and he never turns down the chance to rave about Total War or Crusader Kings. He's also been known to set up shop in the latest MMO and likes to wind down with an endlessly deep, systemic RPG. These days, when he's not editing, he can usually be found writing features that are 1,000 words too long or talking about his dog.