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Get free Sega classics in Amplitude's Endless Summer event

(Image credit: Sega)
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Endless Space 2 (opens in new tab) developer Amplitude Studios is hosting a summery event this week, offering free Sega games, putting on competitions and doing daily streams, including the developer's first German and French language streams. 

Some recent chat in PC Gamer's Slack inspired me to buy up all the Endless Space 2 and Endless Legend DLC I was missing last night, so I was up till 3 am trying to conquer aliens worlds this morning. I've still got energy to tackle the the new custom developer factions in Endless Space 2, though. 

To get access to the freebies, you'll want to sign up to Amplitude's Games2Gether (opens in new tab) programme. It's a community platform that the developer has used for its Endless games to track development, get feedback, give the community free stuff and host events like this. 

By linking your Steam account, you'll be able to grab two of the Sega classics on offer, which include Ecco: The Tides of Time and Ristar. There are a further 23 rewards you can download from Games2Gether, ranging from Endless-themed mocktail recipes to free DLC. 

At E3, Sega told us that the Games2Gether platform was one of the reasons it wanted to acquire Amplitude (opens in new tab), and it's something the publisher would like to see built on, possibly with other studios getting involved. 

The Endless Summer event is live now and will run until July 11. 

Fraser Brown
Online Editor

Fraser is the UK online editor and has actually met The Internet in person. With over a decade of experience, he's been around the block a few times, serving as a freelancer, news editor and prolific reviewer. Strategy games have been a 30-year-long obsession, from tiny RTSs to sprawling political sims, and he never turns down the chance to rave about Total War or Crusader Kings. He's also been known to set up shop in the latest MMO and likes to wind down with an endlessly deep, systemic RPG. These days, when he's not editing, he can usually be found writing features that are 1,000 words too long or talking about his dog.