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Five new Steam games you probably missed (November 25, 2019)

(Image credit: GhostShark)

On an average day, about a dozen new games are released on Steam. And while we think that's a good thing, it can be understandably hard to keep up with. Potentially exciting gems are sure to be lost in the deluge of new things to play unless you sort through every single game that is released on Steam. So that’s exactly what we’ve done. If nothing catches your fancy this week, we've gathered the best PC games you can play right now and a running list of the new games of 2019

Still There

Steam page
Release: November 21
Developer: GhostShark
Price: $14.99 | £11.39 | AU$21.50

Still There is an oddball adventure game about a space lighthouse keeper who receives a troubling radio transmission. Along with his AI companion, protagonist Karl Hamba must keep the lighthouse operating while presumably getting to the bottom of said radio transmission. According to devs GhostShark, Still There is a "story-driven psychological adventure game about lingering grief, technical puzzles, wacky AI and dark humour". Oh, and you consume your own urine in it. Nice.

Overstep

Steam page
Release: November 23
Developer: Gamecan
Price: Free

Launched into Early Access last week, Overstep is a free-to-play 3v3 multiplayer game about fast, acrobatic third-person combat and parkour. Set in the distant future, the setting is a bit like Running Man, except corporations vie to pit powerful and deadly robots against one another as a kind of proxy for real human warfare. At launch there's one map, one customisable robot and a practice mode. The game is set to launch into 1.0 within 12-18 months.

The Political Process

Steam page
Release: November 23
Developer: Verlumino Studios LLC
Price: $14.99 | £11.39 | AU$21.50

Another Early Access launch, The Political Process is a turn-based simulator about navigating the American political system. Playing as either a Democrat or Republican, you'll start off by answering a lengthy questionnaire which will determine your political ideology, before climbing the political hierarchy. There are 80 types of legislation to deliberate over, and you'll be competing or collaborating with over 600 procedurally-generated politicians. There's also a dictator mode, if you're not into democratic elections. The game is estimated to stay in Early Access for a year.

Black Future '88

Steam page
Release: November 22
Developer: SUPERSCARYSNAKES
Price: $19.99 | £15.49 | AU$28.95

I hope you're not sick of the ye olde retrofuturistic sci-fi aesthetic, because here's another shooter in the vein. Black Future '88 is a roguelike 2D shooter about reaching the top of an ever-changing tower and killing its "insane" owner, except things are complicated by the fact that your heart will explode if you stuff around too much. There are five playable characters, each with their own powers and weaknesses, as well as five world types. It's been getting good reviews, and it looks great in action, if you're after a twitchy 2D shooter.

Plutocracy

Steam page
Release: November 22
Developer: Redwood
Price: $24.99 | £19.49 | AU$35.95

Here's a game about trying to become a fat cat billionaire, via investment, buy outs, and lobbying the powers-that-be. "In this game, a player can immerse himself in the real world of capitalists with all the vicissitudes and intrigues as well as feel how the player's decisions change the economies of countries where politicians become his puppets," so reads the description. Definitely a fascinating premise if you remember the ye olde Capitalism game fondly. This is in Early Access and will launch into 1.0 some time next year.

These games were released between November 18 and November 25 2019. Some online stores give us a small cut if you buy something through one of our links. Read our affiliate policy for more info.  

Shaun is PC Gamer’s Australian editor and news writer. He mostly plays platformers and RPGs, and keeps a close eye on anything of particular interest to antipodean audiences. He (rather obsessively) tracks the movements of the Doom modding community, too.