Best cheap gaming PC deals today

Gaming PC deals

If you're seeking the ultimate PC gaming experience without breaking the bank, these cheap gaming PC deals could be precisely what you need. They balance performance and affordability perfectly, ensuring you can enjoy immersive gameplay no matter the budget.

PC gaming can become quite costly and that's where the guidance of experts proves invaluable. That's precisely where we come into play—we've scrutinized the newest systems on sale this week, allowing you to make informed decisions about where to invest your hard-earned money.

Our gaming setups are categorized into three clear tiers: entry-level, sweet spot, and luxury. The sweet spot, nestled within the $1,000 to $2,000 price range, is where you'll encounter numerous gaming systems that deliver exceptional value. However, regardless of your budget, we aim to ensure you get the most bang for your buck. 

Today, we're seeing frequent deals on Nvidia's RTX 40-series cards. Though, mostly on the original wave of non-Super cards. It'll be a while longer before we see major discounts on RTX 4070 Ti Super systems, but there are still affordable systems out there with the latest cards. But if you want more guidance, check out our picks for the best gaming PCs. It'll give you a good idea of how the rigs we've spotted on sale stack up in terms of performance.

Gaming PC deals — quick links

Nvidia GeForce-powered gaming PCs

AMD Radeon-powered gaming PCs

Under $1000

NXS gaming desktop | AMD Ryzen 5 5600G | 16GB DDR4-3600 | 512GB NVMe SSD | $489 at Newegg

NXS gaming desktop | AMD Ryzen 5 5600G | 16GB DDR4-3600 | 512GB NVMe SSD | $489 at Newegg
You can game on this machine to a certain extent—the integrated Vega GPU on the Ryzen chip will certainly support 720p gaming at lower settings. But we're listing it here as a good base from which to add your own graphics card for a quick new gaming PC on a tight budget. The AMD CPU is a good six-core, 12-thread job, and the 16GB RAM will run everything you need.

Yeyian Yumi  | Core i5 12400F | Nvidia RTX 4060 | 16GB DDR4-3200 | 1TB SSD | $799.99 at Newegg (save $400)

Yeyian Yumi  | Core i5 12400F | Nvidia RTX 4060 | 16GB DDR4-3200 | 1TB SSD | $799.99 at Newegg (save $400)
The Yumi is a bit of a classic when it comes to gaming PC deals, as it's always there or thereabouts. At the moment this is the cheapest RTX 4060-based PC we've found, and comes with a supporting spec that is absolutely solid, even if it's not the latest and greatest. The combo of Alder Lake Core i5 and DDR4 memory means you still get the capacity, and a healthy core count, but without the expense of the very latest hybrid Intel chips or pricier DDR5 memory. And gaming performance will vary very little.

Ipason gaming desktop | Ryzen 5 5600 | Radeon RX 7600 | 16GB DDR4-3200 | 1TB SSD | $1,399 $849 at Newegg (save $550)

Ipason gaming desktop | Ryzen 5 5600 | Radeon RX 7600 | 16GB DDR4-3200 | 1TB SSD | $1,399 $849 at Newegg (save $550)
If you don't want to get busy with a screwdriver, Ipason has another budget offering with a built-in upgrade over its $499 5600G-sporting PC, this time with an RX 7600 GPU at its heart. That offers sometimes better than RTX 4060 gaming performance, and the full system comes with a solid back-up spec, too. The Ryzen 5 5600 might not be the latest and greatest but its still very capable as a gaming CPU, and that 1TB SSD gives you a decent amount of space for a few big games and all your files.

Ipason Gaming Desktop | AMD Ryzen 5 5600 | GeForce RTX 4060 Ti | 16GB DDR4-3200 | 1TB NVMe SSD | $1,699 $999 at Newegg (save $700)

Ipason Gaming Desktop | AMD Ryzen 5 5600 | GeForce RTX 4060 Ti | 16GB DDR4-3200 | 1TB NVMe SSD | $1,699 $999 at Newegg (save $700)
The Ryzen 5 5600 chip might be a few years old now, but the six-core, 12-thread CPU is still capable of feeding that RTX 4060 Ti GPU with data enough to deliver impressive gaming frame rates. And the bulk of this machine's budget going on the graphics card makes sense to me. The rest of the spec is classic current middling gaming PC fare, with 16GB of middling DDR4 memory and a 1TB SSD. But it's an RTX 4060 Ti for less than a grand, which is what we want, right?

$1,000 - $2,000

ABS Stratos Aqua | Intel Core i5 14400F | RTX 4060 Ti | 32GB DDR5-6000 | 1TB SSD | $1,599.99 $1,099.99 at Newegg (save $300)

ABS Stratos Aqua | Intel Core i5 14400F | RTX 4060 Ti | 32GB DDR5-6000 | 1TB SSD | $1,599.99 $1,099.99 at Newegg (save $300)
ABS often puts together great prebuilt bundles, but this one in particular stands out as ticking all the right boxes. You've got a very swift Core i5 14400F, an RTX 4060 Ti with all the DLSS goodies that brings, a 1TB NVMe drive for storage and even 32GB of very fast DDR5-6000. Most prebuilts in this price range stick you with 16GB, but the full-fat 32GB here in combination with some other great components makes this a chunky little gaming machine with serious credentials.

Zotac MEK Hero | AMD Ryzen 5 7600 | GeForce RTX 4070 Super | 16GB DDR5-4800 | 1TB NVMe SSD | $1,499.99 at Amazon

Zotac MEK Hero | AMD Ryzen 5 7600 | GeForce RTX 4070 Super | 16GB DDR5-4800 | 1TB NVMe SSD | $1,499.99 at Amazon
The RTX 4070 Super is the direct replacement for the old RTX 4070, delivering RTX 3080 Ti beating performance for half the power. Wrapped up in a rig with six-core, 12-thread Zen 4 processor, a 1TB SSD, and 16GB of DDR5, that makes for quite a compelling package. The only issue is the DDR5 RAM in question is pretty middling stuff at only 4800MHz. That's quick by DDR4 standards, but slow in DDR5 land.

Alienware Aurora R15 | RTX 4070 Ti | Core i7 13700F | 16GB DDR5 | 512GB SSD + 1TB HDD | $1,899.97 $1,732.20 at Amazon (save $167.77)

Alienware Aurora R15 | RTX 4070 Ti | Core i7 13700F | 16GB DDR5 | 512GB SSD + 1TB HDD | $1,899.97 $1,732.20 at Amazon (save $167.77)
This PC includes a very strong Intel processor, and with the ever popular Alienware branding and aesthetic. The 13700F will make easy work of productivity and editing tasks, while the RTX 4070 Ti will be a beast for gaming. The PC does use some proprietary parts which can be a pain, and the 512GB SSD is a weakness, but it's still a great price on a PC with a speedy GPU.

Zotac Gaming MEK Hero G3 | Ryzen 5 7600 | Nvidia RTX 4070 Ti Super | 16GB DDR5 | 1TB SSD | $1,799.99 at Newegg

Zotac Gaming MEK Hero G3 | Ryzen 5 7600 | Nvidia RTX 4070 Ti Super | 16GB DDR5 | 1TB SSD | $1,799.99 at Newegg
The RTX 4070 Ti Super is one of the most interesting of the refreshed Ada graphics cards recently launched by Nvidia for the simple fact that it's the only one that uses a completely new GPU. It now sports the same chip as that in the RTX 4080 and RTX 4080 Super, with more memory than the standard RTX 4070 Ti and a wider memory bus. It's only about 10-15% quicker than the old card, but that does close the gap on the RTX 4080 quite a bit for the same money. You might be a bit down on the low-end Ryzen 5 chip paired with it, but it's a proper Zen 4 CPU, with six cores and 12 threads, and it's more than capable of powering this GPU.

$2,000+

ABS Eurus Ruby | Ryzen 7 7700X | RTX 4080 Super | 32GB DDR5-6000 | 1TB SSD | $2,399 $2,099 at Newegg (save $300)

ABS Eurus Ruby | Ryzen 7 7700X | RTX 4080 Super | 32GB DDR5-6000 | 1TB SSD | $2,399 $2,099 at Newegg (save $300)
Well well, what do we have here? The super quick Ryzen 7 7700X in combination with 32GB of DDR5 6000, a 1TB SSD, and the brand spanking new and truly mighty RTX 4080 Super? Yep, those are specs that bring most machines to their knees, and near the magic $2,000 marker to boot. This is a huge amount of gaming performance for the money, and a tough one to beat.

ABS Tempest Aqua | Core i9 14900KF | RTX 4080 Super | 32GB DDR5-6000 | 2TB SSD | $2,399 $2,449 at Newegg (save $250)

ABS Tempest Aqua | Core i9 14900KF | RTX 4080 Super | 32GB DDR5-6000 | 2TB SSD | $2,399 $2,449 at Newegg (save $250)
How do you beat the machine above, and its almighty specs? Well, how about with an Intel Core i9 14900KF, an absolute monster of a CPU that'll dominate media, productivity tasks and games alike. You also get that super fast RTX 4080, err, Super, 32GB of speedy RAM, and a 2TB SSD that provides a lot more space for your games. The PSU is also a 1000W unit, which makes this a superb platform if you were thinking of eventually sticking in an RTX 4090 or similarly power-hungry GPU.

ABS Tempest Aqua | Core i9 13900KF | RTX 4090| 2TB SSD | 32GB DDR5-6000 | $3,999 $3,199 at Newegg (save $800)

ABS Tempest Aqua | Core i9 13900KF | RTX 4090 | 2TB SSD | 32GB DDR5-6000 | $3,999 $3,199 at Newegg (save $800)
If you're looking for a prebuilt with absolute top flight performance, you'd struggle to do any better than this. A  Core i9 13900KF, 32GB of screaming-fast DDR5 6000 and that all important RTX 4090 means this machine will deliver exceptional performance in absolutely anything you can throw at it, from multimedia crunching to playing the latest games at superb image quality and butter-smooth frame rates. 2TB of NVMe storage rounds out a PC that'll quite simply outperform 99% of the competition.

UK gaming PC deals

ADMI Gaming PC| Core i5 12400F | RTX 4060 | 16GB DDR4-3200 | 1TB SSD | £839.95 at Amazon
Yes, this

ADMI Gaming PC| Core i5 12400F | RTX 4060 | 16GB DDR4-3200 | 1TB SSD | £839.95 at Amazon
Yes, this six-core, 12-thread CPU is now two generations old but for the money, you really can't complain. Well, a bit more RAM would have been nice, but you're not going to get many gaming PCs with a RTX 4060 graphics card for £800. The PSU is only rated to 500W so if you're planning on using this as a base to upgrade in the future, you might need a better supply unit for a top-end GPU.

Scan Gamer RTX Gaming PC| Ryzen 5 5500 | RTX 4070 | 16GB DDR4-3600 | 1TB SSD | £1,099.99 at Scan

Scan Gamer RTX Gaming PC| Ryzen 5 5500 | RTX 4070 | 16GB DDR4-3600 | 1TB SSD | £1,099.99 at Scan
The six-core, 12-thread CPU may be last-gen, and not the fastest one that AMD ever made, but this is still a very good deal for a powerful RTX 4070 machine. It sports dual channel DDR4-3600, which is rare to see in a simple pre-built, and you get a 1TB SSD to load up with games. 

Cyberpower Luxe Core i9 12900KF RTX 4070| 1TB SSD | 32GB DDR5-5200 | $1,814.40 $1,630.80 at Amazon (save $165.60)

Cyberpower Luxe | Core i9 12900KF | RTX 4070 | 1TB SSD | 32GB DDR5-5200 | $1,814.40 $1,630.80 at Amazon (save $165.60)
The all important combination of a blazing fast Core i9 CPU and an RTX 4070 makes for a winning gaming machine, especially when it's paired with 32GB of speedy DDR5. You might want to consider upgrading the SSD to a 2TB model for more space for your games, and probably a PSU upgrade if you install a more powerful GPU in future, but even as it stands this liquid cooled machine should deliver great 1440p framerates and a superb gaming experience.

Cyberpower Luxe Core i9 12900KF RTX 4080| 1TB SSD | 32GB DDR5-5200 | $2,001.60 at Amazon

Cyberpower Luxe | Core i9 12900KF | RTX 4080 | 1TB SSD | 32GB DDR5-5200 | $2,001.60 at Amazon
Deja vu? Yep, this is another Cyberpower Luxe with the fantastic i9 12900KF, but this time with an RTX 4080, and while the RTX 4070 in the machine above is very capable, the RTX 4080 is a major upgrade in gaming performance. You also get a very fancy corner window case to show off those RGB lit fans, making this PC a stunning centerpiece with serious gaming grunt to match.

3XS Gamer RTX | AMD Ryzen 7 7800X3D | Nvidia RTX 4090 | 32GB DDR5-5600 | 2TB PCIe 4.0 SSD | £3,099.98 at Scan

3XS Gamer RTX | AMD Ryzen 7 7800X3D | Nvidia RTX 4090 | 32GB DDR5-5600 | 2TB PCIe 4.0 SSD | £3,099.98 at Scan
You're probably think that this isn't much of a good deal but when RTX 4090 cards cost £2,000 on average, it looks a whole lot better. You're getting the best gaming CPU around, the fastest gaming GPU, lots of speedy dual-channel RAM, and plenty of NVMe storage. This is about as fast a gaming machine as you can get your hands on, and even at over £3,000 this is still a monster of a PC at a good price.

Graphics card hierarchy

The most important component for any gaming PC build will always be the graphics card. That will give you the best idea about how one machine matches up with another just in terms of raw gaming performance.

Below, we've listed the slew of GPUs we've had over the past couple of years listed in terms of their Time Spy Extreme index score as a way to put them in some consistent hierarchy.

Should I build my own gaming PC or buy a prebuilt?

One of the biggest advantages of putting together your own budget gaming PC build is the ability to choose every single component in the system. This allows you to shop around for deals and find the perfect combination of parts to fit your budget and performance needs. The downside for most inexperienced builders is that this whole process can take some time and has the potential to cause quite a headache if something goes wrong. This is where prebuilt gaming PCs really shine.

When you pay the premium to configure or purchase a prebuilt PC, you pay for more than just the parts. You are paying for warranty service, support, and the peace of mind that professionals put your system together. These are some of the things we value highly when considering the best budget gaming PCs. We also look at other unique selling points like design, upgradability, and anything you couldn't do when building it yourself.

Now that graphics cards are regularly available and the silicon shortage is starting to clear up, building your own PC is much easier than it was before. A prebuilt rig is still a reliable way to get your desired graphics card.

For most users that don't have the luxury of spending over $1000 on a prebuilt gaming PC, upgradability and performance per dollar are paramount. When we decided to choose our top choices for budget prebuilt gaming PCs, we looked at almost every major manufacturer and system integrator to find the best combination of value, reliability, customer feedback, design, and performance under $500 and under $1,000. 

We still highly recommend the experience of building it yourself, but if you can't do that, one of the systems above will have you gaming in short order.

What is a decent price for a gaming PC

The $1,000 - $1,500 mark is probably around the sweet spot for a new gaming PC. That will get you a graphics card that can nail 1440p at solid frame rates and a really good supporting spec. That should mean a relatively sizeable NVMe SSD, around 500GB, as well as 16GB of speedy memory and a modern CPU.

Is PC gaming better than console?

Unquestionably. In real terms, it's more expensive in terms of hardware, but there is a games library stretching back decades that no other gaming platform can possibly match. Games are also regularly cheaper or free on PC, too.

The PC is also more capable of doing more things than a games console, too. Try browsing the web on your PlayStation, and you'll know what we mean. It can also be portable, in either laptop or Steam Deck style.

What PC is equivalent to a PS5?

We suggest that the AMD RX 6700 GPU will deliver around the same level of raw graphics performance as Sony's PS5. That's an OEM part, so you'll only find it in a prebuilt gaming PC, but it's an 11.3 TFLOP GPU versus the 10.3 TFLOP of the PS5.

Those numbers aren't wholly comparative, but you would also need an 8-core CPU, 16GB of memory (though the PS5's is spread between GPU and system), and a 500GB+ SSD.

ABS Eurus Aqua | Core i7 13700F | Nvidia RTX 4070 Ti | 16GB DDR5-5600 | 1TB SSD | $2,099.99 $1,699.99 at Newegg (save $400)

ABS Eurus Aqua | Core i7 13700F | Nvidia RTX 4070 Ti | 16GB DDR5-5600 | 1TB SSD | $2,099.99 $1,699.99 at Newegg (save $400)
Another great deal on an ABS PC, this time featuring the still blisteringly quick i7 13700F, with 16GB of DDR5 and that all-important RTX 4070 Ti, a GPU that on it's own can range north of the $900 mark. 1TB of SSD storage is reasonably generous for this sort of price, although you'll probably want to consider pairing that great CPU/GPU combo with a little more RAM and some extra storage space if you want to turn it into a true gaming titan. Regardless, as upgrade platforms go, this is a very, very capable base, and should do you proud.

**back to full price - 07/02/24**

Dave James
Managing Editor, Hardware

Dave has been gaming since the days of Zaxxon and Lady Bug on the Colecovision, and code books for the Commodore Vic 20 (Death Race 2000!). He built his first gaming PC at the tender age of 16, and finally finished bug-fixing the Cyrix-based system around a year later. When he dropped it out of the window. He first started writing for Official PlayStation Magazine and Xbox World many decades ago, then moved onto PC Format full-time, then PC Gamer, TechRadar, and T3 among others. Now he's back, writing about the nightmarish graphics card market, CPUs with more cores than sense, gaming laptops hotter than the sun, and SSDs more capacious than a Cybertruck.