8 Black Friday deals to improve your livestreaming setup

Logitech light and NZXT capture card and Elgato Stream Deck on turquoise background with Black Friday Deals logo
(Image credit: Logitech ./ NZXT / Elgato)

You don't have to spend loads of money to significantly improve your livestreaming setup. This year's Black Friday deals have shaved the price off of some popular accessories that you can use to improve streaming for both you and your viewers.

These are items that supplement a basic streaming setup, which should already include a relatively powerful gaming PC, a solid microphone or headset, and a nice webcam. Some of these tools can be replicated in a much cheaper way, like using a regular lamp instead of a fancy key light, but the consistently good results you get from purpose-made products give you one less thing to think about while broadcasting.

I've ordered the items by importance for most streamers. Obviously the vtubers and Jerma's of the world will probably need a little more than this to fit their endeavors, but most people can get a lot out of something like a capture card or a well-built microphone stand. And everything is at or below the cheapest prices I've seen.

Lighting

Logitech Litra Glow | USB-C | 2700K - 6500K | 800 lumens | $59.99 $49.99 at Amazon (save $10)

Logitech Litra Glow | USB-C | 2700K - 6500K | 800 lumens | $59.99 $49.99 at Amazon (save $10)
Logitech's little streaming light can clip onto your monitor like a webcam and add some brightness to your shot. You can cycle through different color temperatures via the button on the back or create custom presets in Logitech's software. It won't do the job of a powerful key light, but it can make your face much more visible if you stream with a simple webcam overlay.

Price check: $49.99 Best Buy | $49.99 B&H Photo

Neewer GL1 Pro | Bluetooth, USB | 2900K-7000K | 2800 lumens | $129.99 $90.99 at Amazon (save $39)

Neewer GL1 Pro | Bluetooth, USB | 2900K-7000K | 2800 lumens | $129.99 $90.99 at Amazon (save $39)
Neewer has its GL1 Pro key lights on sale for anyone who needs to properly light their streaming setup. You can link multiple lights together and sync them up with an Elgato Stream Deck to control them on your PC. You'll want a powerful light like this if you regularly stream with a camera and need the strong lighting for IRL streams and the like.

Price check: $135.99 B&H Photo

Nanoleaf Shapes Triangle Kit | 7 panels | RGB | 560 lumens| $199.99 $149.99 at Best Buy (save $50)

Nanoleaf Shapes Triangle Kit | 7 panels | RGB | 560 lumens| $199.99 $149.99 at Best Buy (save $50)
Nanoleaf's RGB light panels are purely an accessory that will improve the aesthetics of your stream rather than the clarity. There's a reason everyone has these in the back of their camera shot: they're eye-catching and customizable. There are plenty of ways to do a similar setup with LED strip lights at a cheaper price, but it'll be tough to make something look as minimalist and bright as these.

Price check: $149.99 Home Depot

Green screen

Elgato Green Screen | 58.27 x 70.87 inch | collapsible | polyester| $159.99 $119.99 at Amazon (save $40)Price check:

Elgato Green Screen | 58.27 x 70.87 inch | collapsible | polyester| $159.99 $119.99 at Amazon (save $40)
You can pick up a variety of different cheap green screens online and they would probably work if you have the space, time, and tools to hang them up. With Elgato's collapsible green screen, however, you're paying for the convenience. You can extend it far enough to cover a person of average height standing in front of it, and if you want, you can retract it and store it for later.
Price check: $119.99 Best Buy

Capture card

Elgato HD60 X external Capture Card | USB 3.0 | Up to 4K 30 fps | HDR10 | VRR passthrough | $179.99 $139.99 at Amazon (save $40)
Price check:

Elgato HD60 X external Capture Card | USB 3.0 | Up to 4K 30 fps | HDR10 | VRR passthrough | $179.99 $139.99 at Amazon (save $40)
You'll need a capture card if you plan to stream more than PC games. Elgato remains the king of capture cards with its HD60 X. You can hook it to your PC with USB and use Elgato's software or OBS to stream with it. It works with all modern consoles and can crank out high-quality 4K footage.
Price check: $139.99 Best Buy | $139.99 Elgato

NZXT Signal HD60 | USB Type-C | Up to 1080p 60 fps| $99.99 $59.99 at Amazon (save $40)

NZXT Signal HD60 | USB Type-C | Up to 1080p 60 fps| $99.99 $59.99 at Amazon (save $40)
NZXT's external capture card won't push out as high of a resolution as others and lacks some of the fancy features, like HDR and VRR support, but it's a great budget pick. It's a tiny device that hooks up to your consoles and puts out solid-looking 1080p footage.

Price check: $59.99 Best Buy

Microphone arm

Elgato Wave Mic Arm | 9.06 x 2.36 x 19.29 inches | clamp | 360 degree rotation | supports 250 - 750g microphones| $99.99 $69.99 at Amazon (save $30)

Elgato Wave Mic Arm | 9.06 x 2.36 x 19.29 inches | clamp | 360 degree rotation | supports 250 - 750g microphones| $99.99 $69.99 at Amazon (save $30)
Compared to the many microphone arms you can find online, the Elgato Wave Mic Arm has a wide range of movement and doesn't wobble. A mic arm can help you keep an organized setup that isn't crowding your view. And if you have an expensive microphone, you don't want it attached to something that could break or cause unwanted noise when you swivel it around.

Price check: $69.99 Best Buy

Stream Deck

Elgato Stream Deck MK.2 | USB Type-C | 15 LCD keys| $149.99 $119.99 at Amazon (save $30)

Elgato Stream Deck MK.2 | USB Type-C | 15 LCD keys| $149.99 $119.99 at Amazon (save $30)
The purpose of Elgato's Stream Deck is vast. You set it up so that each button changes your stream overlay, swaps to a certain scene in OBS, opens programs, or controls your music. It's highly customizable and can save you from having to manually swap things over while you're live. Keyboard shortcuts can solve this problem for free, but the LCD buttons on the Stream Deck remove the need to memorize anything.

Price check: $119.99 Best Buy

Associate Editor

Tyler has covered games, games culture, and hardware for over a decade before joining PC Gamer as Associate Editor. He's done in-depth reporting on communities and games as well as criticism for sites like Polygon, Wired, and Waypoint. He's interested in the weird and the fascinating when it comes to games, spending time probing for stories and talking to the people involved. Tyler loves sinking into games like Final Fantasy 14, Overwatch, and Dark Souls to see what makes them tick and pluck out the parts worth talking about. His goal is to talk about games the way they are: broken, beautiful, and bizarre.