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Five new Steam games you probably missed (November 16, 2020)

Fragile
(Image credit: Beer Night Studios)

On an average day, about a dozen new games are released on Steam. And while we think that's a good thing, it can be understandably hard to keep up with. Potentially exciting gems are sure to be lost in the deluge of new things to play unless you sort through every single game that is released on Steam. So that’s exactly what we’ve done. If nothing catches your fancy this week, we've gathered the best PC games you can play right now and a running list of the 2020 games that are launching this year. 

Fragile

Steam‌ ‌page‌ ‌
Release:‌ ‌November 11 ‌
Developer:‌ Beer Night Studios
Price:‌ ‌$14.99‌ ‌|‌ ‌£11.39‌ ‌|‌ ‌AU$21.50

Absolutely not for the faint of heart, Fragile is a horror game whose 10-year-old protagonist must escape "a secret organization that deals in human trafficking and other horrendous activities". Aside from the unique grimness of the setting, it seems fairly straightforward as far as 2D horror games go: you'll be evading "monsters" (scare quotes the dev's) and solving puzzles steeped in realism. I haven't played Fragile myself, so I can't vouch for how successful it is at what it sets out to achieve, but the concept definitely warrants further investigation.

Raiders! Forsaken Earth

Steam‌ ‌page‌ ‌
Release:‌ ‌November 11
Developer:‌ ‌Creative Storm Entertainment
Price:‌ ‌$19.99‌ ‌|‌ ‌£15.49‌ ‌|‌ ‌AU$28.95

...and now for something lighthearted. Raiders! Forsaken Earth is about directing and maintaining a ragtag crew of post-apocalyptic marauders—you know, the kind you normally murder in Wasteland and Fallout games. It's a management game at heart: in addition to visiting hell upon other settlements in order to loot them, you'll be creating laws, hiring new raiders, and extracting necessary resources by all means necessary. You can eat your raiders too, apparently. Aren't videogames charming?

Prodeus

Steam‌ ‌page‌ ‌
Release:‌ ‌November 10
Developer:‌ Bounding Box Software
Price:‌ ‌$24.99‌ ‌|‌ ‌£19.49‌ ‌|‌ ‌AU$35.95

'90s-inspired first-person shooters are coming thick and fast these days, but Prodeus takes a slightly different tack: unlike, say, Ion Fury, which uses the ye olde Build engine, Prodeus is "a first-person shooter of old, re-imagined using modern rendering techniques". For this reason, it has a fairly unique aesthetic, with its chunky pixels colliding with (comparatively) modern weapon models. But all that aside, it looks really fun, and it comes out of the gate with its own inbuilt level editor. The game is in Early Access, mostly for feedback and testing, and will launch into 1.0 within 8-12 months. 

No Place for the Dissident

No Place for the Dissident

(Image credit: David M.)

Steam‌ ‌page‌ ‌
Release:‌ ‌November 13
Developer:‌ ‌David M. ‌
Price:‌ ‌$19.99‌ ‌|‌ ‌£15.99‌ ‌|‌ ‌AU$28.95

No Place for the Dissident looks kinda like Plague Inc, but instead of spreading deadly disease you're spreading ideology. A "strategic political simulator", you'll choose from a list of ideologies and do your darnedest to ensure it overtakes the globe. Of course, there will be nations and societies who resist your ideas, and half of the job in No Place for the Dissident is to make sure they yield to your desires, no matter the cost.

Paw Paw Paw

Steam‌ ‌page‌ ‌
Release:‌ ‌November 14 ‌
Developer:‌ Simpleton
Price:‌ ‌$9.99‌ ‌|‌ ‌£7.99‌ ‌|‌ ‌AU$14.50

It's been a pretty bleak Five Steam Games You Probably Missed instalment this week, so here's a nice antidote: Paw Paw Paw is a sidescrolling beat 'em up featuring cute(ish) animals. It has a looter RPG element, a handful of classes to choose from, and you can play it with three friends locally. Did I mention it has cute animals in it? What a relief.

These games were released between November 9 and 16 2020. Some online stores give us a small cut if you buy something through one of our links. Read our affiliate policy for more info. ‌

Shaun Prescott
Shaun is PC Gamer’s Australian editor and news writer. He mostly plays platformers and RPGs, and keeps a close eye on anything of particular interest to antipodean audiences. He (rather obsessively) tracks the movements of the Doom modding community, too.