Day of the Tentacle Remastered system requirements revealed

Day of the Tentacle
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It's been well over a year since the remastered edition of the Lucasarts comedy classic Day of the Tentacle was announced, but aside from a few screens that were rolled out last October, we really haven't heard much about it since. Today, however, GOG (with a little help from co-creator Tim Schafer) announced that the game will be out on March 22.

Day of the Tentacle Remastered features updated graphics and a new, modernized interface, but will also support the original visual style and interface, for adventurers who prefer to roll old-school. As for the game itself, its bona fides are already well-established: Designed by Schafer and David Grossman, it was released in 1993 as the sequel to Maniac Mansion, and while it wasn't a huge hit commercially, it's come to be regarded as one of the best, and most nostalgically durable, games of the Lucasarts era.

Alas, a PC that ran Day of the Tentacle in 1993 is not going to get the job done today. This is what you'll need to play in 2016.

Minimum:

  • Windows: XP (Service Pack 3) / Vista / 7 / 8 / 10
  • Processor: 1.7 GHz Dual Core
  • Memory: 2 GB
  • Graphics: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 260, ATI Radeon 4870 HD, Intel HD 3000, or equivalent card with at least 512 MB VRAM
  • DirectX Version: 9.0
  • Disk Space: 2.5 GB
  • Sound Card: DirectX Compatible Sound Card
  • Additional Notes: Must have OpenGL 3 with GLSL version 1.3

Recommended:

  • Windows: 7 / 8 / 10
  • Processor: Intel Core 2 Duo at 2.2 GHz, AMD Athlon 64 2.2 GHz
  • Memory: 3 GB
  • Graphics: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 460, AMD Radeon HD 6850
  • DirectX Version: 11
  • Disk Space: 2.5 GB
  • Sound Card; DirectX Compatible Sound Card
  • Additional Notes: Must have OpenGL 3 with GLSL version 1.3

Day of the Tentacle Remastered is available for preorder now, at ten percent off the regular $15 price, at GOG (opens in new tab).

Andy has been gaming on PCs from the very beginning, starting as a youngster with text adventures and primitive action games on a cassette-based TRS80. From there he graduated to the glory days of Sierra Online adventures and Microprose sims, ran a local BBS, learned how to build PCs, and developed a longstanding love of RPGs, immersive sims, and shooters. He began writing videogame news in 2007 for The Escapist and somehow managed to avoid getting fired until 2014, when he joined the storied ranks of PC Gamer. He covers all aspects of the industry, from new game announcements and patch notes to legal disputes, Twitch beefs, esports, and Henry Cavill. Lots of Henry Cavill.