Cyberpunk 2077 studio says this E3 will be its 'most important one ever'

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In case there was any doubt following the huge splash that Cyberpunk 2077 made at E3 2018, CD Projekt confirmed last month that it will be back for this year's show. And this time around, CD Projekt president and CEO Adam Kiciński says the stakes will be even higher.   

"Last year's E3 has been the most important one so far throughout the whole CD Projekt history," Kiciński said during the company's 2018 financial results presentation. "But this year's is going to be the most important one ever for us. We have really prepared a strong show." 

Later on in the presentation, Kiciński said the studio will have some "surprises" at the show (but no "pop artists," sorry), and while some publishers have made a point of publicly de-prioritizing E3, he stated that, for CD Projekt at least, it and similar shows remain "the best moments for big announcements of big launches during the year." 

He also talked about boosting CD Projekt's staffing levels, which he said is being done primarily to support the studio's next game, an unannounced RPG. "[It's] mainly [the] next production, because the CP team is not going to grow that much anymore. But as a company, we are going to grow indeed. In our industry, creative capacities are in direct proportion to the team sizes because it's people doing and creating what we are selling. We don't plan to stop at a certain level." 

For now, CD Projekt is remaining characteristically silent about what that project might be—although Kiciński allowed that it's going to be something brand new.   

"It's too early to go into details just now," he said. "We are doing a lot of things we don't communicate, and I'm not saying another Cyberpunk product is or is not being developed. It's just that there are a few things we're not discussing just yet." 

The full presentation can be seen below.

Andy has been gaming on PCs from the very beginning, starting as a youngster with text adventures and primitive action games on a cassette-based TRS80. From there he graduated to the glory days of Sierra Online adventures and Microprose sims, ran a local BBS, learned how to build PCs, and developed a longstanding love of RPGs, immersive sims, and shooters. He began writing videogame news in 2007 for The Escapist and somehow managed to avoid getting fired until 2014, when he joined the storied ranks of PC Gamer. He covers all aspects of the industry, from new game announcements and patch notes to legal disputes, Twitch beefs, esports, and Henry Cavill. Lots of Henry Cavill.