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The spider-squashing, house-demolishing game Kill It With Fire is coming in August

Kill It With Fire is a bonkers first-person game about arachnophobia and proportional response. I took a look at a demo for the game back in April and enjoyed it a lot: It's dumb—really dumb—but demolishing a house to kill a few bugs (who were just minding their own business) is a lot of fun, and kind of cathartic, too.

The game was expected to be out in July when I played the demo, but it's going to be a wee bit later than that. Developer Casey Donnellan announced today that Kill It With Fire will launch on Steam on August 13. He also dropped a new trailer showcasing some over-the-top spider-squishing action ("kill it with fire" is a very on-the-nose title) and said that a new demo is on the way too. The original, available through the Kill It With Fire Steam page, is still playable, but a standalone build called Kill It With Fire: Heatwave will launch on July 17 with updates that will offer more of what the game is all about.

  • Adds a new mission where players can explore the kitchen, laundry room, and garage to encounter new spiders, complete new objectives, and find new equipment.
  • The first two missions have been re-mixed with content from later in the full game.
  • Each mission now features an Arachno-Gauntlet with a unique challenge.
  • Cheese Puffs now come in multiple flavors which can transform spiders into new types.
  • Exciting new upgrades, including a radar display on the spider tracker!
  • New Equipment: energy drink, assault rifle, frying pan, and molotov
  • New Spiders: Queen Spider, Jumping Spider, Invisible Spider
  • Destructible glass and other objects, updated spider SFX, improved spider climbing, and much much more!

For a closer look at Kill It With Fire and the ins and outs of killing spiders with elephant guns, check out the extended gameplay trailer below.

Andy covers the day-to-day happenings in the big, wide world of PC gaming—the stuff we call "news." In his off hours, he wishes he had time to play the 80-hour RPGs and immersive sims he used to love so much.