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Fortnite now has at least three cracks in reality, and they're growing

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Over the weekend, disaster struck in Fortnite as a rocket created a crack in reality. If you didn’t see it, you’ve missed it, but we have captured it for posterity. Since the initial attack on the sky, and presumably existence itself, the fracture has expanded. Other tears have appeared on the map, too, and yes, they’re also getting bigger. Oh dear. 

On Saturday, a rocket blasted off from the Fortnite island, slowly shooting up until it came back down again, blinked in and out of our universe, and finally cracked the very sky itself. Science has a lot to answer for, that’s for sure. Players have noticed that the crack has expanded quite a bit since the initial explosion, and you can see part of it creeping across the sky in screenshots posted on Reddit

The second crack is located next to Lonely Lodge. It started off as just a shimmering smudge—more optical illusion than apocalyptic portent—but has since started to look a lot like the big one in the sky. Worse, it seems to be hungry. It’s swallowing stuff up, and the lodge isn’t looking very safe right now. 

A third anomaly has appeared at the motel, and there’s bad news for fans of motel signage: the crack is swallowing it up. 

Will anything be left by the end of this, or will we all be playing season five in a huge, empty universe? 

Cheers, Fortnite Intel

Below, check out the rocket launch from the weekend, as taken by our friends at GamesRadar:

Fraser is the UK online editor and has actually met The Internet in person. With over a decade of experience, he's been around the block a few times, serving as a freelancer, news editor and prolific reviewer. Strategy games have been a 30-year-long obsession, from tiny RTSs to sprawling political sims, and he never turns down the chance to rave about Total War or Crusader Kings. He's also been known to set up shop in the latest MMO and likes to wind down with an endlessly deep, systemic RPG. These days, when he's not editing, he can usually be found writing features that are 1,000 words too long or talking about his dog.