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Five new Steam games you probably missed (February 4, 2019)

On an average day, about a dozen new games are released on Steam. And while we think that's a good thing, it can be understandably hard to keep up with. Potentially exciting gems are sure to be lost in the deluge of new things to play unless you sort through every single game that is released on Steam. So that’s exactly what we’ve done.     

Praey for the Gods

Steam page
Release: February 1
Developer: No Matter Studios
Price: $29.99 | £23.79 | AU$42.95

Praey for the Gods is unashamedly indebted to Shadow of the Colossus: it's a "boss climbing open world adventure game" with an art style reminiscent of Fumito Ueda's work. There are survival elements, though. The game's lone protagonist will not only craft weapons and other gear, but also requires food and warmth in order to survive the harsh (and never-ending) winter. Launched into Early Access last week, Praey for the Gods has been in various stages of alpha and beta for two years, but the studio wants to keep working on it for another 6-12 months. 

Heat

Steam page
Release: January 31
Developer: Code}{atch
Price: $19.99 | £15.49 | AU$28.95

Set during the beginnings of the 20th Century in America, Heat is a survival MMO with, uh, a lot going on. Based on the trailer above, it's fairly action focused. But don't be fooled: while there is definitely combat in this game, the Steam description focuses on its rather deep life sim elements. For example, players can pair up with other players or NPCs to start families. Did I mention you could become the president? You can, or you could also go plough the fields or go tame some lifestock. It's a fascinating project – it'll be in Early Access for "at least 12 months".

Rainswept

Steam page
Release: February 2
Developer: Frostwood Interactive
Price: $11.99 | £9.29 | AU$16.95

Rainswept is a point-and-click adventure game staring detective Michael Stone, who's arrived in Pineview to investigate a suspected murder-suicide. But as you'd expect, things aren't quite what they seem, and Stone and his assistant Amy Blunt will have their sanity tested as they dive deeper into the case. In addition to lots of "pine trees, coffee and rain", Rainswept features a charming art style that isn't afraid to use color, despite the somber subject matter. 

Foundation

Steam page
Release: February 2
Developer: Polymorph Games
Price: $16.99 | £14.49 | AU$23.95

Launched into Early Access last week, Foundation is a medieval city builder with one very attractive selling point: it's not grid-based. That means cities and towns can twist and bend in ways befitting ye olde medieval settlements, all complemented with the kind of monuments you'd expect. According to the studio Polymorph games, Foundation "puts the emphasis on the organic aspects of urbanism in the cities of old", but it's not just about laying paths and deciding where buildings should go: you'll need to manage the finer aspects of life as well. It's a damn gorgeous looking game, and while it still has a year left in Early Access, the game is fully playable and contains "around 40%" of what the 1.0 version will have.

Earth Atlantis

Steam page
Release: January 30
Developer: Pixel Perfex
Price: $14.99 | £11.99 | AU$21.50

Earth Atlantis is a side-scrolling schmup set during a time when "ninety six percent of the earth's surface is underwater". Interestingly, studio Pixel Perfex has opted to complement this theme with a hand-drawn art-style which references "the essence of the 14th century's ocean exploration", and it makes total sense: ensconced in your fairly-squishy looking sub, you'll be exploring the sub-aquatic ruins in search of the 25 large monsters cruisin' for a bruisin'. Definitely one to try if the lovely art-style appeals.

These games were released between January 28 2019 and February 4 2019. Some online stores give us a small cut if you buy something through one of our links. Read our affiliate policy for more info.  

Shaun is PC Gamer’s Australian editor and news writer. He mostly plays platformers and RPGs, and keeps a close eye on anything of particular interest to antipodean audiences. He (rather obsessively) tracks the movements of the Doom modding community, too.