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Five new Steam games you probably missed (August 19, 2019)

(Image credit: Hogo Company)

On an average day, about a dozen new games are released on Steam. And while we think that's a good thing, it can be understandably hard to keep up with. Potentially exciting gems are sure to be lost in the deluge of new things to play unless you sort through every single game that is released on Steam. So that’s exactly what we’ve done. If nothing catches your fancy this week, we've gathered the best PC games you can play right now and a running list of the new games of 2019

Dum-Dum

Steam page
Release: August 14
Developer: Hogo Company
Price: $14.99 | £11.39 | AU$21.50

Dum-Dum is a fascinating game about exploring a 1980s operating system. Dubbed Hogo OS 1985 Edition, it was meant to revolutionise computing, what with its support for 426x240 resolution and all. But then it mysteriously disappeared, and the object of Dum-Dum is to discover why, via exploring the operating system itself. As you'd expect, the game is strewn with neat 1980s references and mini-games (including a cool looking rip-off of Autobahn), but the real star is the conspiratorial yarn it spins. "Rumors say that an evil mastermind attempted to use Hogo OS to take over the world," the description reads, "and was only stopped by the bumbling actions of a complete idiot." Def one for fans of Hypnospace Outlaw and other terminal-oriented games.

Warfork

Steam page
Release: August 17
Developer: Team Forbidden
Price: Free

Warfork is a free-to-play arena FPS which brings the open source Warsow to Steam, along with an Early Access status promising ongoing support. As you'd expect from an arena shooter, it's a high skill affair, with all the usual modes including Team Deathmatch, in addition to traversal-oriented modes like Race. The game will stay in Early Access for up to a year, with improvements to graphics, performance and mod support planned.

Overpass

Steam page
Release: August 15
Developer: Studio Bean
Price: $14.99 | £11.39 | AU$21.50

Here's a rhythm game with an interesting approach: it's described as a "road trip rhythm game" because the circuits course through beautiful and strange 3D landscapes, with a perspective that resembles laying flat across the backseat of a (luxury) car. There's 30 levels across eight environments, as well as a track editor and Workshop support. Luke loved it when he played an early build back in 2017.

Exception

Steam page
Release: August 13
Developer: Traxmaster Software
Price: $14.99 | £11.39 | AU$21.50

Exception is a fast-paced, twitch oriented platformer set inside a grandma's virus-ridden PC. But let's face it: it doesn't really matter where Exception is set, nor why you're a neon-glowing man with a sword. It's first and foremost a platformer about fluid balletic movement, with each level's perspective shifting dramatically with the collection of flashy items. Every effort has been made to make this a pick-up-and-immediately-play affair, to the point where skipping cutscenes and exposition is basically encouraged after the completion of each level. Everything is flashy in Exception, it can sometimes make you feel dizzy, but it feels good in short bursts.

DARQ

Steam page
Release: August 15
Developer: Unfold Games
Price: $19.99 | £15.49 | AU$28.95

DARQ is an adventure game with a fancy monochrome goth aesthetic – kinda like a Tim Burton film, or a Tool filmclip. You play as Lloyd, who is stuck inside a nightmare and unable to wake up. The game doles out stealth and puzzle-solving, the latter centred around the game's 3D perspective shifting mechanic, which basically lets you walk on walls and ceilings. Definitely one to check out if you're into puzzles, or you're a goth, or both.

These games were released between August 12 and August 19 2019. Some online stores give us a small cut if you buy something through one of our links. Read our affiliate policy for more info.  

Shaun is PC Gamer’s Australian editor and news writer. He mostly plays platformers and RPGs, and keeps a close eye on anything of particular interest to antipodean audiences. He (rather obsessively) tracks the movements of the Doom modding community, too.