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Resident Evil Village locations have been mapped out thanks to a collector's edition bonus

A Resident Evil Village screenshot.
(Image credit: Capcom)
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The scariest part of Resident Evil Village isn't the dark pits, shambling monsters, or nine-foot-tall vampire women. It's looking like a bloody tourist as you stumble through the Village streets, not knowing your spooky castles from your meat factories. Now, thanks to a leaked collector's edition map, you can plan your trip confidently with full knowledge of Capcom's gothic mountain town.

Alongside an art book and a statue of Chris Redfield, Resident Evil Village's collector's edition contains a big cloth map of the titular village. Now, thanks to Redditor Orpheus2020 (via GamesRadar), we have a full image to pore over.

Granted, the map is more stylistic than useful—we're not getting a breakdown of every trail, basement, and torture dungeon. But it does reveal a number of major locations, which may count as spoiler territory for folks who want to go into Village blind.

(Image credit: Capcom)

While the map is a bit too crunchy to make out most of the locations, we do get our four main landmarks. Castle Dimitrescu is, shockingly, the likely home of the internet's favourite giantess, a sprawling and ornate gothic manor. But it's not the only fancy house in town—just down the road we've got House Beneviento, perched precariously on the edge of a cliff.

Heisenberg's factory is practically a town unto itself, one that I reckon is likely full of deadly mechanical traps. Finally, Moreau's Reservoir sits at the edge of town, acting as the genre-required spooky forest. Probably full of werewolves, I'd guess.

Sadly, that map is only available as part of said $220 collector's edition—hardly cheap, but practically small change when put beside Chris Redfield's naff $1500 jacket. Thankfully, it doesn't cost a penny to be drowned in a tidal wave of Lady Dimitrescu fan-art.

Natalie Clayton

20 years ago, Nat played Jet Set Radio Future for the first time—and she's not stopped thinking about games since. Joining PC Gamer in 2020, she comes from three years of freelance reporting at Rock Paper Shotgun, Waypoint, VG247 and more. Embedded in the European indie scene and having herself developed critically acclaimed small games like Can Androids Pray, Nat is always looking for a new curiosity to scream about—whether it's the next best indie darling, or simply someone modding a Scotmid into Black Mesa. She's also played for a competitive Splatoon team, and unofficially appears in Apex Legends under the pseudonym Horizon.