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Postal 2, a very bad videogame, is free on GOG

(Image credit: Running With Scissors)
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Postal 2 is a notoriously bad game (opens in new tab). As Computer Gaming World put it back in 2003, "until someone boxes up syphilis and tries to sell it at retail, Postal 2 is the worst product ever foisted upon consumers." But at least one other site took a different perspective: PC Gamer rated it 71% on the strength of its ambitions and ideas, although we noted at the same time that it's amateurish, sophomoric, indefensible, in bad taste, and "really not very good at all."

Confused? Me too, to be honest. But if your confusion is leavened with curiosity, GOG can help sort it out. Until 9 am PT on December 18, Postal 2 is free for the taking as part of GOG's ongoing Winter Sale (opens in new tab). You'll need to scroll down the front page a bit to find it—once you do, just mash that "get it free" button and it'll be automatically added to your account.

Postal 2 is a very bad game, but it's also interesting as a historical curiosity. It will never not be tasteless, but the level of wanton, kill-'em-all violence that used to cause shocked gasps and wrung hands is now pretty much par for the course. It makes me think of the twin-stick shooter Hatred (opens in new tab), which was released in 2015: It too was violent and tasteless, and not especially good, but the biggest controversy surrounding its launch was its removal from Steam Greenlight, a decision which was quickly reversed by Valve (opens in new tab).

Despite its craptastic notoriety (which developer Running With Scissors has embraced), another sequel is on the way. Postal 4: No Regerts (opens in new tab) was announced and released in October in early access on GOG and Steam. 

Andy has been gaming on PCs from the very beginning, starting as a youngster with text adventures and primitive action games on a cassette-based TRS80. From there he graduated to the glory days of Sierra Online adventures and Microprose sims, ran a local BBS, learned how to build PCs, and developed a longstanding love of RPGs, immersive sims, and shooters. He began writing videogame news in 2007 for The Escapist and somehow managed to avoid getting fired until 2014, when he joined the storied ranks of PC Gamer. He covers all aspects of the industry, from new game announcements and patch notes to legal disputes, Twitch beefs, esports, and Henry Cavill. Lots of Henry Cavill.