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Free-to-play sci-fi shooter Ironsight debuts on Steam today

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Ironsight (opens in new tab) is a free-to-play sci-fi military shooter set in a near-future that's been devastated by natural disasters. As is the way of things, the world has split into two factions, constantly at war over what few natural resources remains, including a new and powerful energy source called Trinitium. It's been in open beta since February 2018 at aeriagames.com, but today the beta will finally make the move to Steam.

The move to Steam comes alongside a major content update that will add a pair of new maps to the game: Station, set in a Russian train station enveloped in snow, and, Discovery, a mysterious industrial compound hidden within a dense jungle that provides a natural home for snipers. The update also adds a new weapon, the Type 89 Assault Rifle, and a FlyTrap drone that will shield players from incoming grenades. A new Capture the Flag mode has been added—the Station map was actually designed for CTF play—and there's also a new Battle Pass on offer, with new missions and exclusive rewards.

Prior to the open beta release last year, Ironsight was in closed beta (opens in new tab) testing in South Korea—it's developed by South Korean studio Wiple Games—and as we noted at the time, it looks pretty solid: It had 14 maps and more than 100 weapons, and the drones play a major part in the action as well, enabling players to drop napalm, set off EMPs, or fortify defensive positions. And it doesn't look too bad, either. The Quiet-style sniper bikini seen in the trailer is ridiculous and embarrassing, yes, but there's a Deus Ex visual vibe to some of the locations and outfits that I really like.

Ironsight is listed on Steam (opens in new tab) now and will go live later today. (The exact time hasn't been set, but should be before 12 pm ET.) More information is up at aeriagames.com (opens in new tab).

Andy has been gaming on PCs from the very beginning, starting as a youngster with text adventures and primitive action games on a cassette-based TRS80. From there he graduated to the glory days of Sierra Online adventures and Microprose sims, ran a local BBS, learned how to build PCs, and developed a longstanding love of RPGs, immersive sims, and shooters. He began writing videogame news in 2007 for The Escapist and somehow managed to avoid getting fired until 2014, when he joined the storied ranks of PC Gamer. He covers all aspects of the industry, from new game announcements and patch notes to legal disputes, Twitch beefs, esports, and Henry Cavill. Lots of Henry Cavill.