Lawsuit filed against Sony over alleged DualSense PS5 controller drift issue

Sony Dualsense
(Image credit: Sony)
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I've always been a Sony fan myself, but a recent lawsuit over the PS5 DualSense controller is making me question my life choices. 

Have you ever had the issue where, despite your non-action, your controllers analog stick still manages to sense some mystical input, causing your character to drift aimlessly off a cliff or stare wistfully into the sky? Same. And so have a buttload of other people in online forums, as well as Sony's own pre-release testers for the hardware, reportedly.

Disgraced by the controller's alleged issues, along with Sony's apparent wilful negligence on the matter, Chimicles Schwartz Kriner & Donaldson-Smith LLP have now filed a class action lawsuit against the company.

Cut the cord...

(Image credit: Steelseries)

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According to IGN (opens in new tab) and Metro (opens in new tab), the case documentation notes that the problem "significantly interferes with gameplay and thus compromises the DualSense controller’s core functionality." It goes on to claim Sony's action was "fraudulent, deceptive, unlawful, and unfair," especially considering the limited repair options available for the issue.

Being a class action lawsuit, any US citizen who's felt the pain of the supposedly "defective" controllers can raise the stakes of the case by adding their evidence to the claim, potentially landing a payout in the event that Sony loses the case. You read that right: those who've experienced this might manage to receive some money over their controller's drift issue, but only if Sony is found to be at fault. 

Katie Wickens
Hardware Writer

Screw sports, Katie would rather watch Intel, AMD and Nvidia go at it. Having been obsessed with computers and graphics for three long decades, she took Game Art and Design up to Masters level at uni, and has been demystifying tech and science—rather sarcastically—for two years since. She can be found admiring AI advancements, scrambling for scintillating Raspberry Pi projects, preaching cybersecurity awareness, sighing over semiconductors, and gawping at the latest GPU upgrades. She's been heading the PCG Steam Deck content hike, while waiting patiently for her chance to upload her consciousness into the cloud.