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League of Legends All-Stars 2014 tournament starts May 8

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People are playing League of Legends right now. Millions of people . From May 8 to May 11, though, the best players in the world are going to be playing League of Legends in the All-Star 2014 tournament, and millions of people are going to be watching. But how will you watch? Where will you watch? Riot's put together a handy list of who's competing and when. Here's the coolest thing about this year's All-Star Challenge, which precedes the tournament: fans voted on which pro League players get to compete.

The All-Star Invitational is a classic tournament brawl—the five top-ranked LoL teams in the world are facing off until only two remain. Those teams are:

  • North America: Cloud 9
  • Taiwan: Azubu Taipei Assassins
  • Europe: Fnatic
  • Korea: SK Telecom TK I
  • China: OMG

You can find the full schedule for the tournament on the League of Legends website .

Every morning (Paris time) before the Invitational kicks off, two fan-picked teams dubbed Fire and Ice will compete in the All-Star Challenge's four different modes: 1v1, U.R.F. , Hexakill , and the Pick 10 . The international super squads will be facing off in teams of six (dare we hope for an actual hexakill?), playing the champions that fans picked, dueling one on one, and causing all kinds of chaos in the April Fools Ultra Rapid Fire mode .

Riot is showing off its goofy side, and the All-Star Challenge will offer a rare opportunity to see how pro players perform outside their comfort zones and usual teams. Will the teams fall victim to language barriers? Heated rivalries? The irresistible draw of the Paris nightlife? With luck, the All-Star Challenge will be a gloriously messy sideshow for the Invitational.

Check out the LoL eSports website from May 8 to 11 to catch livestreams of the 2014 All-Star extravaganza.

Wes has been covering games and hardware for more than 10 years, first at tech sites like The Wirecutter (opens in new tab) and Tested (opens in new tab) before joining the PC Gamer team in 2014. Wes plays a little bit of everything, but he'll always jump at the chance to cover emulation and Japanese games.


When he's not obsessively optimizing and re-optimizing a tangle of conveyor belts in Satisfactory (it's really becoming a problem), he's probably playing a 20-year-old Final Fantasy or some opaque ASCII roguelike. With a focus on writing and editing features, he seeks out personal stories and in-depth histories from the corners of PC gaming and its niche communities. 50% pizza by volume (deep dish, to be specific).