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If you type 'gg ez' in Overwatch, prepare to look like even more of a loser

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Blizzard snuck a hilarious gag into the patch (opens in new tab) that hit the Overwatch public test realm today. The change automatically edits the text chat of anyone who types a certain phase into the match channel—don't worry, you'll only be affected if you're a jerk.

As Eurogamer (opens in new tab) noticed, if you type "gg ez" (as in, "good game, easy win") and hit enter, your text will instantly output a random response created by Blizzard. The swapped text lines range from sportsmanlike to outright self-deprecating:

"Well played. I salute you all."

"For glory and honor! Huzzah comrades!"

"I'm wrestling with some insecurity issues in my life but thank you all for playing with me."

"It's past my bedtime. Please don't tell my mommy."

"Gee whiz! That was fun. Good playing!"

"I feel very, very small... please hold me..."

And more. There are, of course, still ways to type out the video game equivalent of extending your hand to shake your opponent's after a match, then retracting it at the last moment to touch your hair. Typing "ggez" is also auto-edited by Overwatch, but other variations aren't, and similarly mindless meme phrases like "get rekt" remain unpoliced. 

It's unclear whether this feature (I feel very comfortable calling it that) is Blizzard having a bit of fun, or if it'll actually find its way into the final game. But given Blizzard's approach to player communication in Hearthstone, for example, I wouldn't be surprised if this text filter makes it into the final patch.

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Evan Lahti
Evan Lahti

Evan's a hardcore FPS enthusiast who joined PC Gamer in 2008. After an era spent publishing reviews, news, and cover features, he now oversees editorial operations for PC Gamer worldwide, including setting policy, training, and editing stories written by the wider team. His most-played FPSes are CS:GO, Team Fortress 2, Team Fortress Classic, Rainbow Six Siege, and Arma 2. His first multiplayer FPS was Quake 2, played on serial LAN in his uncle's basement, the ideal conditions for instilling a lifelong fondness for fragging. Evan also leads production of the PC Gaming Show, the annual E3 showcase event dedicated to PC gaming.