Skip to main content

Five new Steam games you probably missed (April 20, 2020)

(Image credit: Arkhouse Telegnosis)

On an average day, about a dozen new games are released on Steam. And while we think that's a good thing, it can be understandably hard to keep up with. Potentially exciting gems are sure to be lost in the deluge of new things to play unless you sort through every single game that is released on Steam. So that’s exactly what we’ve done. If nothing catches your fancy this week, we've gathered the best PC games you can play right now and a running list of the new games of 2020

Saturn Quest: Shadow of Planetus

Steam‌ ‌page‌ ‌
Release:‌ ‌April 15
Developer:‌ ‌Arkhouse Telegraph
Price:‌ ‌$2.99‌ ‌|‌ ‌£2.09‌ ‌|‌ ‌AU$4.50‌ ‌

Described as a "shameless 8-bit style clone of Shadow of the Colossus," Saturn Quest: Shadow of Planetus probably won't tug at the heartstrings like that Team Ico classic. On the contrary: this top-down game seems to have a tone befitting its garish psychedelic pixel art, so expect blissful disorientation. As the trailer above shows, the   game is all about taking down giant robotic monstrosities, sometimes via precarious navigation, at other times with bullets, baby. Definitely one to play if you're after something strange.

Later Daters

Steam‌ ‌page‌ ‌
Release:‌ ‌April 17
Developer:‌ ‌Bloom Digital Media
Price:‌ ‌$7.99‌ ‌|‌ ‌£5.79‌ ‌|‌ ‌AU$11.50‌ 

Later Daters is a dating sim set in a retirement community. As far as I know, it's the only dating sim set in a retirement community, so full points for originality. Aside from that novelty it does look genuinely fun: according to the Steam description the retirement community is "a lot like summer camp, but with orthopedic shoes, bridge clubs, and more jell-o." You can customise the look of your flirtatious elder, and there are eight residents to woo. This is the first episode of a serialised story.

STATIONflow

Steam‌ ‌page‌ ‌
Release:‌ ‌April 15
Developer:‌ ‌DMM Games
Price:‌ ‌$17.99‌ ‌|‌ ‌£13.99‌ ‌|‌ ‌AU$25.95

Most if not all people have fantasized about building and maintaining a perfect underground rail station, so STATIONflow (the devs' stylization) grabbed my attention immediately. It's not a mere builder: the goal is to optimise foot traffic flow, which means taking care of every aspect of a station's architecture. Are the corridors wide enough? Are the signs legible? Will the toilets give you the plague? You'll also be managing budget and the watchful eyes of your employers, so don't expect to sit back and make the station of your dreams (though it does appear there's a sandbox mode). 

Drug Dealer Simulator

Steam‌ ‌page‌ ‌
Release:‌ ‌May‌ ‌11‌ ‌
Developer:‌ ‌Byterunners Game Studio
Price:‌ ‌$19.99‌ ‌|‌ ‌£15.49‌ ‌|‌ ‌AU$28.95‌ 

As the name implies, it's a game about being a drug dealer, played from a first-person perspective. I'm not sure how much the "simulator" aspect should be taken to heart, but if it's a tycoon game with crime you're after, it's amassed some decent reviews on Steam. You'll start small time and hopefully make it big (which, as far as I can tell, involves going to strip joints and shooting bottles from poolside deckchairs), and the while avoiding the police and DEA. There's a demo, too.

Aground

Steam‌ ‌page‌ ‌
Release:‌ April 18
Developer:‌ Fancy Fish Games
Price:‌ ‌$14.99‌ ‌|‌ ‌£11.39‌ ‌|‌ ‌AU$21.50‌ 

Aground launched into 1.0 last week, after a period in Early Access. It's a sidescrolling RPG fairly reminiscent of Terraria (the studio describes it as a mining / crafting RPG), in the sense that it's a lot more involved than its cute pixel art implies. It has most of the things you'd expect: mining, construction, quests, farming, crafting, NPCs to befriend / antagonise, and dragons. 

These games were released between April 13 and 20 2020. Some online stores give us a small cut if you buy something through one of our links. Read our affiliate policy for more info.  

Shaun is PC Gamer’s Australian editor and news writer. He mostly plays platformers and RPGs, and keeps a close eye on anything of particular interest to antipodean audiences. He (rather obsessively) tracks the movements of the Doom modding community, too.