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Doom is getting an officially licensed 'bone vodka'

(Image credit: Bethesda Softworks)

I've seen a lot of cross-promotional stuff for videogames in my time, some good and some, not so much. (Remember when EA partnered with real-world weapon manufacturers to promote the Medal of Honor reboot?) And some of it—like, for instance, Doom Bone Vodka— is just downright weird.

It is real, though, as Bethesda UK confirmed on Twitter.

First things first: What, exactly, is "bone vodka?" According to The Spirits Business, marrow is extracted from beef bones that have been roasted and smoked, and is macerated in a neutral grain alcohol. It's then distilled at a low temperature in a vacuum still, resulting in a "dry, earthy start," an "umami and buttery feel on the tongue," and a finish that's smoky [and] peppery." The Rebel Distillers, the company making the vodka, describes the drink as a "world first vodka, using bones sourced from world-famous butchers The Ginger Pig." 

"We’re tapping into one of the world’s favorite hobbies, video games, to offer a unique perspective in spirit production," Rebel Distillers co-founder Matt McGivern said. "Doom Eternal is a world of flames and demons, a barbecue pit with action—a smoked bone vodka is certainly a new take on spirit provenance."

This actually isn't the first time Bethesda has licensed one of its games for a booze tie-in: Fallout 76 got its own promotional alcohol, Nuka Dark Rum, last year. Unfortunately, as detailed by Paste, it wasn't very good. The bottle was a lightweight plastic with a dull, monochrome label, and the rum itself "peters out into a weak coconut-caramel flavor that leaves a film on the lips when drank straight." It apparently wasn't much better mixed.

If that doesn't put you off, the 700ml bottles—about 24 ounces—go for £45 ($55) each, and are now available for preorder, but currently only in the UK, EU, and Australia. They're expected to begin shipping near the end of September, just in time for the release of Doom Eternal on November 22.

Andy covers the day-to-day happenings in the big, wide world of PC gaming—the stuff we call "news." In his off hours, he wishes he had time to play the 80-hour RPGs and immersive sims he used to love so much.