Five new Steam games you probably missed this week

Archives — May-December 2017 

These are the archived entries from past weeks. For this week's new releases, go to the first page of this article. 

Odysseus Kosmos and his Robot Quest

Steam Page
Released: December 2
Developer: Pavel Kostin
Publisher: HeroCraft
Price: $14.99 / £14.99

This is a neat looking, pixel-art point’n’click adventure about a man and his robot. Specifically, it’s about space ship engineer Odysseus Kosmos and his service robot, known as Barton Quest. Together, Kosmos and Barton are stuck in deep space, alone, near a black hole no less, waiting for their former crewmates to return from a nearby planet where time moves faster. Naturally enough, things go awry: the lonely boredom starts to get… weird. Odysseus Kosmos and his Robot Quest has a really lovely art style, and the concept sounds great. Better still, you can download the pilot demo episode for free, which is followed by the five episodes you’ll get for the asking price.

Nick

Steam Page
Released: December 1
Developer: Firstborn Games
Publisher: Firstborn Games
Price: Free

Nick is a free wave-based shooter just out of Early Access. It’s of note because it’s a VR title, and as far as action-oriented VR titles go, this looks pretty decent (did I mention it’s free?). Designed for HTC Vive, you play as Santa, fending off “endless waves of evil robotic elves” with his gun. In other words, the most violent Christmas-themed entertainment since Die Hard. There’s a defense element too, with defense systems to build and strategies to deploy, but the main thing is that you’re slaying evil elves in VR. And it’s free.

W4RR-i/o-RS

Steam Page
Released: November 30
Developer: Xitilon
Publisher: Xitilon
Price: $0.99 / £0.79

This is a text-based simulation game where you’re playing as a “faithfully emulated human”. Or at least, you’re tasked with “simulating a human’s decision making system”. It doesn’t look like you should go into W4RR-i/o-RS seeking gratification or victory, as player input seems minimal. The concept is great though. “This is an art-game about a 4th Millenium corporation ZN, which semi-automatically mines astral particles from simulated human minds,” the description reads. “Though, as the player assumes a direct control over such a pawn, nothing of the surrounding lore is shown, and this is exactly the author's intent. You decide the fates, but don't see anything actually going on. Imagine your purpose is just to simulate a human's decision making system, in a lack of information beyond the spreadsheet numbers.” Sounds fun.

Dustwind

Steam Page
Released: November 30
Developer: Dustwind Studios
Publisher: Z-Software GmbH, Dustwind Studios
Price: $17.99 / £13.99

This new Early Access entrant is a real-time tactics RPG heavily reminiscent of Wasteland 2, though it has a multiplayer focus. There’s a variety of modes, ranging team deathmatch, assault co-op and “capture the gas” – kinda like capture the flag except you’re flogging petrol for generators. According to the Steam page there “no fixed classes, no grinding, no unlocking” and crucially “no pay-to-win”, though that doesn’t mean there isn’t plenty of character customisation involved. Or else, you could play as a dog, which is possible. I’d play as the dog, to be honest.

Super Dungeon Boy

Steam Page
Released: November 29
Developer: Tower Up Studios
Publisher: Tower Up Studios
Price: $0.99 / £0.79

This week’s retro-styled platformer is Super Dungeon Boy, for those among us who never tire of running, jumping and obliterating whimsical foes. Like any of its kin, Super Dungeon Boy sells itself on its difficulty, so don’t expect to breeze through its 26 levels. “This game can provoke many WORDS and obscene gestures !!!” regales the Steam page. If this isn’t to your taste, another 2D platformer which released this week, Ghoulboy, looks like a more mild-mannered affair.

These games were released between 11/28-12/04. The first page of this list is updated every Sunday and previous weeks are archived on the following pages. Some online stores give us a small cut if you buy something through one of our links. Read our affiliate policy for more info.