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Watch James McAvoy and Daisy Ridley discuss the making of 12 Minutes

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In a new presentation of indie time loop game 12 Minutes, we get a few fun snippets of behind the scenes footage of actors Daisy Ridley and James McAvoy recording dialogue and talking about their characters. The game's other star Willem Dafoe sadly doesn't make an appearance, but it's a fun insight into the making of this hotly-tipped indie thriller.

Ridley and 12 Minutes developer Luis Antonio both talk about how the game's top-down view influences her acting. "Particularly because you don't see our faces in it, you really are projecting whatever you're feeling onto the character. There are no facial expressions that are instructing you. Where you go in the game I think will depend on you as an individual," she says.

"If there's enough subtlety in the voice acting and the movement your brain will fill in the rest," says Antonio. "Actors think in terms of motivations. What's my motivation for this scene? Workshopping with them, figuring those things out, allows the characters to become alive and meaningful in the way they behave."

I got to play 12 Minutes back in May (opens in new tab), and found some surprises in how its time loop story plays out. I was also impressed by the voice acting, which is almost uncomfortably intimate as you abruptly insert yourself into the relationship of the couple played by Ridley and McAvoy. (Also impressive because neither of them show a hint of their native accents).

We'll hopefully be able to see how the mystery plays out within the next few months—Antonio still plans to release 12 Minutes this year.

Wes Fenlon
Wes Fenlon

Wes has been covering games and hardware for more than 10 years, first at tech sites like The Wirecutter (opens in new tab) and Tested (opens in new tab) before joining the PC Gamer team in 2014. Wes plays a little bit of everything, but he'll always jump at the chance to cover emulation and Japanese games.


When he's not obsessively optimizing and re-optimizing a tangle of conveyor belts in Satisfactory (it's really becoming a problem), he's probably playing a 20-year-old Final Fantasy or some opaque ASCII roguelike. With a focus on writing and editing features, he seeks out personal stories and in-depth histories from the corners of PC gaming and its niche communities. 50% pizza by volume (deep dish, to be specific).