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The best SSD for gaming 2019

The best SSD for gaming 2019
(Image credit: Samsung, Crucial)

 Buying the Best SSD for gaming is one of the most cost-effective ways to quickly increase the overall speed of your rig. If you're still relying on old "spinning-platter" HDDs to write and store your data, you're putting an unnecessary cap on your gaming PC's overall performance. SSD prices are the lowest they've ever been, and while you may not see the same storage per dollar ratio that you would get with HDDs, the boost in performance is well worth the extra investment.

NVMe drives are hands-down the fastest option when it comes to read/write speeds, but they often deliver diminishing returns compared to SATA drives and can be less cost-effective when it comes to storage. There are a few exceptions, however, with some 'budget' M.2 drives now falling below SATA price levels. Still, you need an M.2 slot and not every PC has one of those. SATA drives still remain, pound-for-pound, one of the best options if you're building a budget gaming PC. Samsung's 860 EVO series is still a rock-solid option, but for those willing to stretch their budget, Crucial's P1 NVMe drive delivers blazing-fast transfer speeds.    

This is our current list for the best SSDs for gaming, as well as an outline of our testing process. If these models don't give you the kind of speed you're looking for, make sure to look at the best NVMe SSDs we've tested. 

Best SSDs for gaming

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(Image credit: Crucial)

1. Crucial P1 1TB NVMe

Great performance, price, and capacity

Capacity: 1TB | Interface: M.2 PCIe 3x4 | Sequential IO: 2000/1700MB/s read/write | Random IO: 170K/240K IOPS read/write

Super fast R/W speeds
Respectable brand
Solid power efficiency
Reduced performance when full
QLC results in weaker random IO

On paper, the Crucial P1 is the obvious choice in this roundup. With the highest advertised read/write speeds on our list, paired with a budget price point, it seems like there's no contest. It costs less than many SATA drives.

Unfortunately, the rated speeds don't always hold up under load or when the drive is mostly full. When we filled the P1 to around half of its rated capacity, we experienced transfer speeds more closely resembling SATA SSDs. That's thanks to the QLC (Quad-Level Cell) NAND, which stores 4-bits of data per cell.

Still, for gaming workloads it rivals most of the SATA drives on this list, and there's little reason not to make this a part of your next budget build, assuming you have an NVMe slot. The Crucial P1's low price point and compact, reliable form factor make it difficult to pass up, especially if you're set on an NVMe drive (and have the requisite M.2 slot).

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(Image credit: Samsung)
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(Image credit: Samsung)

2. Samsung 860 Evo 1TB

A balanced blend of price, performance, and reliability

Capacity: 1TB | Interface: SATA 6Gb/p/s | Sequential IO: 550/520MB/s read/write | Random IO: 98K/90K IOPS read/write

As fast as SATA gets
Proven Samsung reliability
SATA bottlenecks
Sometimes higher prices

If there's one company that tends to rule in the SSD market space, it's Samsung. The 850 Evo was a long-time favorite and remains viable even today, but the 860 Evo line has largely displaced it. Samsung trades blows with Crucial for our top pick, depending on capacity and current prices, but both are excellent drives with proven reliability and performance.

The 1TB 860 Evo hits the sweet spot for price and performance, and the higher capacity models are also worth a look, especially as they're relatively cheap and dropping in price as the months go by.

These are great SATA drives, so you're unlikely to have compatibility issues here. The newer Samsung 970 drives are great, if you're looking for a faster NVMe alternative, but they currently cost quite a bit more. The 860 Evo remains one of the fastest SATA drives overall, and Samsung has a well deserved reputation for reliability. It's often on sale for less at Amazon or Newegg, so keep an eye open for discounts.

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(Image credit: Samsung)
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(Image credit: Samsung)

3. Samsung 860 QVO 2TB SATA

High capacity SATA at a reasonable price

Capacity: 2000GB | Interface: SATA 6Gb/s | Sequential IO: 550/520MB/s read/write | Random IO: 97K/89K IOPS read/write

High capacity
Reliable
Encryption options
Pricey (but 2TB!)

Samsung is a prolific name in the SSD sphere. It's often the first with groundbreaking storage technology, and delivers rock solid products. The Samsung 860 QVO is a great representation of these principles. It was the first major QLC drive (4-bits per cell), helping to drive down costs.

The 860 QVO doesn't necessarily deliver lightning fast transfer speeds when compared to other SATA SSDs, but it offers a safe and reliable storage platform. While it does share very similar specifications to the tried and true EVO line of Samsung SSDs, the QVO provides additional security precautions in the form of AES 256-bit encryption with Windows Bitlocker support.   

The 860 QVO is an obvious choice for anyone that needs to store large amounts of sensitive data, but it's price tag makes it difficult to recommend when set against it's peers. It's why we're specifically recommending the 2TB model, where $20 extra gets you the peace of mind Samsung provides.

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(Image credit: Intel)
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(Image credit: Intel)
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(Image credit: Intel)
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(Image credit: Intel)

4. Intel 660p 2TB

High capacity and low cost make the 660p a winner

Capacity: 2000GB | Interface: M.2 PCIe 3x4 | Sequential IO: 1800/1800MB/s read/write | Random IO: 220K/220K IOPS read/write

High capacity
Solid Value
Slows down when nearly full
Lower endurance

When it comes to speed, it's tough to beat an NVMe drive's sequential transfer rates. The Intel 660p easily beats any SATA drive for such workloads, and for gaming use it delivers consistent performance with a high storage capacity. It's also the cheapest 2TB SSD currently available, period.

There are two drawbacks. One is that performance can drop when the drive is more than 80 percent full, and random write performance can be pretty low. That's typical of all QLC drives.

The other potential concern is that it has a lower rated endurance. The 512GB model is rated at 100TBW, while the 2TB drive has a 400TBW rating. But let's put that into perspective. 100TBW is about 55GB of data writes each day, every day, for five years. No consumer workload is going to do that, and the 2TB drive bumps that to 220GB per day. Yeah.

Intel has a 5-year warranty, like many other manufacturers, and it's unlikely the 660p would fail during that time. With the good speed and extremely competitive price point, the Intel 660p is a strong competitor for our best gaming SSD. Just be wary of the 512GB model, where performance starts lower and it's much easier to fill up more than half the drive.

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(Image credit: Crucial)
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5. Crucial MX500 1TB

One of the fastest SATA drives, and a great value

Capacity: 1000GB | Interface: SATA 6Gb/s | Sequential IO: 560/510MB/s read/write | Random IO: 95K/90K IOPS read/write

One of the fastest SATA drives
Competitive price per GB
Can't touch NVMe performance
500GB model a bit expensive

The ideal SSD for a gaming PC strikes a perfect price/performance/reliability balance, which is more difficult than it sounds. Crucial's MX500 is one of the few drives that really has no weak points, and with game install sizes getting larger, buying the largest SSD you can afford is becoming increasingly important.

The MX500 is one of the top performing SATA drives, and perhaps more important, it's one of the more affordable SSDs. It ends up delivering an incredible value, and the only way to get meaningfully faster results is to move to an NVMe drive.

Crucial's random IO read and write speeds are pretty much on a par with those found in the Samsung 860 EVO model, if a little bit slower in some of our tests, and given its lower price, you can still make a case for Crucial's MX500 over the other SATA drives. It used to be tied for our top pick, but now the Crucial P1 costs less and generally performs better. That's the price of progress.

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(Image credit: Adata)
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6. Adata Ultimate SU800 1TB SATA

Affordable SATA performance at a great price

Capacity: 1000GB | Interface: SATA 6Gb/s | Sequential IO: 560/520MB/s read/write | Random IO: 90K/80K IOPS read/write

Competitive pricing
High endurance
Below average speeds

If you're looking for an entry level SATA drive, the Adata Ultimate SU800 is a solid jumping off point. While its rated transfer speeds are competitive with the fastest SATA drives, it doesn't always maintain those speeds under sustained workloads. Still, it's easier to look past that given the SU800's lower price point.

A couple of features do manage to set the SU800 apart. The included Acronis Data Migration utility makes it easy to upgrade an existing PC with an SSD, including the OS. It's particularly helpful if you have a not-full larger HDD that you're migrating to a smaller SSD, where free utilities often fail. Adata's SSD Toolbox also keeps you up to date on firmware and helps manage and optimize your storage.

The SU800 may not necessarily beat its peers, but it still offers reliable and consistent performance at an attractive price.

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(Image credit: Silicon Power)
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7. Silicon Power A55 1TB SATA

A budget-friendly upgrade for any PC still using a hard drive

Capacity: 1000GB | Interface: SATA 6Gb/s | Sequential IO: 560/530MB/s read/write | Random IO: 80K/80K IOPS read/write

Inexpensive 1TB Storage
Low random R/W speeds

Silicon power is hardly a household name when it comes to SSDs, but the company has been around quite a few years now and has made a name selling budget-friendly SSD storage. True to that heritage, the Silicon Power A55 is a super inexpensive option for 1TB of SATA storage, making it an excellent option for budget builds.

The sequential Read/Write speeds appear competitive with other SATA drives (the maximum theoretical throughput on SATA is about 560MB/s), but as with some other budget options, sustained writes will often drop below the rated performance. Sometimes by a lot. Random write I/O is also lower than other SSDs and has the potential to bottleneck performance, but for consumer use it's less of a factor.

Overall, the Silicon Power A55 may not be the fastest SSD, but it's certainly fast enough. Compared to even the fastest hard drives (eg, a WD Black 4TB), even a 'slow' SSD is usually faster. And at $90 for 1TB of NAND storage, it's large enough to hold quite a few games.

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(Image credit: Mushkin)
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(Image credit: Mushkin)
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8. Mushkin Enhanced Source 500GB

An old favorite, for those shopping on a budget

Capacity: 500GB | Interface: SATA 6Gb/s | Sequential IO: 560/520MB/s read/write | Random IO: 75K/81K IOPS read/write

Low cost 500GB drive
Performance is decent
Middling overall performance
Slow sustained random writes

Mushkin's Source line of SATA drives are a bit older now, and they use 3D TLC NAND to reach lower prices. The 500GB model currently sells for as little as $55, though the 1TB drive costs quite a bit more.

While performance is relatively modest (the older Mushkin Reactor beats the Source in several tests), this is an easy upgrade for any budget system currently lacking an SSD. And if you're okay with 500GB instead of 1TB, it's a very cost effective upgrade.

Mushkin releases surprisingly reliable drives, for the price, so you're getting an SSD that will perform for a good few years here. The manufacturer itself lists the endurance as '3 years', which is a little vague, but that seems about right based on our past experiences with its drives.

How we test SSDs

SSDs make your whole system faster and more pleasant to use. But they matter for gaming, too. A fast-loading SSD can cut dozens of seconds off the load times of big games like Battlefield 5 or MMOs like World of Warcraft. An SSD won't normally affect framerates like your GPU or CPU, but it will make installing, booting, dying, and reloading in games a faster, smoother process.

When shopping for a good SSD for gaming, one of the most important factors is price per gigabyte. How much will you have to spend to keep a healthy library of Steam games installed, ready to be played at a moment's notice? With many new games surpassing the 50GB mark, this becomes even more critical.

To find the best gaming SSDs, we researched the SSD market, picked out the strongest contenders, and put them through their paces with a variety of benchmarking tools. We also put in the research to know what makes a great SSD great, beyond the numbers—technical stuff like types of flash memory and controllers.

We have tested all of the drives recommended in this guide. The fact is, for gaming purposes the difference between the slowest (eg, Mushkin Source or Silicon Power) and fastest (eg, Samsung 970 Evo Plus) SSD is often quite small. Even a slow SSD can run circles around a hard drive and save 15-20 seconds on load times, but outside of copying files around or verifying Steam installs, NVMe drives aren't noticeably faster.