Titanfall 2 now costs less than a Big Mac, its lowest ever price on Steam

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Let's not mince words: Titanfall 2 (opens in new tab) has one of the best singleplayer shooter campaigns of all time. And now you can pick it up for just $3—that's right, a lowly three bucks—on Steam (opens in new tab).

There's really not much to say about Titanfall 2 that hasn't been said before. A boy and his robot chew bubblegum and kick ass is a vaguely dystopian far future—but whoops, they're all out of bubblegum. It isn't the most unique videogame setup of all time, and frankly my expectations were a little low going in. But even if they'd been sky-high, Titanfall 2 would've easily surpassed them.

How good is it? This good:

  • "A brilliant singleplayer campaign married to inventive, skill-intensive multiplayer that calls back to FPS classics of old." PC Gamer, 91% review (opens in new tab)
  • Titanfall 2's "Effect and Cause (opens in new tab)" level is one of the best uses of time travel in videogames and a legit Great Moment in PC Gaming
  • One of the best knives (opens in new tab) in PC gaming history
  • Multiplayer: saved! (opens in new tab)
  • Player count (opens in new tab) remains solid. (Remember, this is a seven-year-old game.)

So, having established that it is in fact that good, there's really no excuse not to pick it up right here and now if you have even the slightest interest in shooters. It's three bucks. That's literally cheaper than a Big Mac. And for those who keep track of such things, IsThereAnyDeal (opens in new tab) also indicates that it's the cheapest Titanfall 2 has ever been on Steam. Seriously, just get it. It's on sale until February 2.

Andy Chalk

Andy has been gaming on PCs from the very beginning, starting as a youngster with text adventures and primitive action games on a cassette-based TRS80. From there he graduated to the glory days of Sierra Online adventures and Microprose sims, ran a local BBS, learned how to build PCs, and developed a longstanding love of RPGs, immersive sims, and shooters. He began writing videogame news in 2007 for The Escapist and somehow managed to avoid getting fired until 2014, when he joined the storied ranks of PC Gamer. He covers all aspects of the industry, from new game announcements and patch notes to legal disputes, Twitch beefs, esports, and Henry Cavill. Lots of Henry Cavill.