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Star Wars Battlefront season pass priced at $50

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Star Wars Battlefront

Electronic Arts has announced that a season pass will be available for Star Wars Battlefront, and it won't be cheap. That last bit isn't actually part of the announcement, but it's true: The pass, a collection of four planned DLC releases, will set you back $50 if you pay for it all up front.

Given the conventions of season pass discounting (which is to say, what Activision did with Advanced Warfare), the Star Wars Battlefront DLC packs will likely sell separately for $15 each, or $60 all told. That's just a guess, of course. It's quite possible that the expansions will sell for $12.50 each, and buying the season pass will save you no money at all. Either way, it will get you two-week advance access to each expansion release, and a "Shoot First" emote.

Fifty bucks is expensive, but, as noted, not unprecedented. But it's an awful lot to pay for something sight-unseen, that doesn't even actually exist yet, for a game that people may or may not be sick of by the time the final (or the third, or the second, or the first) expansion is released. Not that I'd presume to tell anyone what to do, but in my eyes that's a pretty big risk to take, just to save a tenner.

The Star Wars Battlefront season pass is available for pre-purchase on Origin, and will also be included as part of the Star Wars Battlefront Ultimate Edition, which sells for $140.

In case you haven't had a chance to give it a rip, the Star Wars Battlefront beta, which was originally slated to end on October 12 (that's today), has been extended one more day. It's open to everyone and actually pretty good.

Andy Chalk

Andy has been gaming on PCs from the very beginning, starting as a youngster with text adventures and primitive action games on a cassette-based TRS80. From there he graduated to the glory days of Sierra Online adventures and Microprose sims, ran a local BBS, learned how to build PCs, and developed a longstanding love of RPGs, immersive sims, and shooters. He began writing videogame news in 2007 for The Escapist and somehow managed to avoid getting fired until 2014, when he joined the storied ranks of PC Gamer. He covers all aspects of the industry, from new game announcements and patch notes to legal disputes, Twitch beefs, esports, and Henry Cavill. Lots of Henry Cavill.