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No Man's Sky is coming to Xbox Game Pass for PC in June

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Cosmic sandbox No Man's Sky (opens in new tab) is going where many games have gone before, as it's getting a Windows PC version and coming to the Microsoft Store. This isn't normally a cause for celebration, granted, but the news also coincides with its imminent arrival on Xbox Game Pass for PC. 

This means you can take No Man's Sky for a spin for £1/$1 if you're a new subscriber, which will increase to a £4/$5 subscription after the first month. That's pretty great just for a month of No Man's Sky, but Game Pass also boasts a library that includes Sea of Thieves, PC Gamer's best ongoing game of 2019 (opens in new tab), and the surprisingly great Gears Tactics (opens in new tab)

No Man's Sky wasn't quite what we were hoping for when it launched in 2016, but over the course of countless updates it's grown into an elaborate space exploration romp and a creative outlet. There's building now, and proper multiplayer, as well as mechs, living ships and multiple storylines—Hello Games has had a very busy few years. And it's all been integrated into the base game, so don't need to shell out for DLC extras. 

It's still a bit of an acquired taste, but that makes it perfect for something like Game Pass, where you can spend a quid and, if it's not your thing, you'll probably find at least a few games other games to keep you occupied. 

You'll be able to download No Man's Sky on Xbox Game Pass for PC in June. 

Fraser Brown
Fraser Brown

Fraser is the UK online editor and has actually met The Internet in person. With over a decade of experience, he's been around the block a few times, serving as a freelancer, news editor and prolific reviewer. Strategy games have been a 30-year-long obsession, from tiny RTSs to sprawling political sims, and he never turns down the chance to rave about Total War or Crusader Kings. He's also been known to set up shop in the latest MMO and likes to wind down with an endlessly deep, systemic RPG. These days, when he's not editing, he can usually be found writing features that are 1,000 words too long or talking about his dog.