Minecraft in Halo 3 is a destructible delight

Minecraft in Halo 3.
(Image credit: InfernoPlus)
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Some mods were just meant to be, and Halo 3 as Minecraft feels like one of them. Created by longtime Halo and Souls modder InfernoPlus, the snappily named Halocraft is a multiplayer map pack that works with Halo: The Master Chief Collection and replaces four maps with destructible Minecraft maps.

That's probably the most impressive thing about this. Obviously the Halo side of things works perfectly, but the way it interacts with the Minecraft side is what blows your block off. Weapon fire, melee damage and grenades all damage the scenery to various extents, and the maps are built around this in different ways: one has a load of easily smashable glass panels over a fatal drop, and you can imagine how those matches play out.

Me? I just want to get the hammer and watch the world burn. Or at the very least collapse around my feet.

I saw the mod on youtuber UberNick's channel, where you can watch him play some matches in it, and you can download Halocraft from InfernoPlus' patreon here. It's worth emphasising just how impressive this mod is: Halo MCC is not built to have destructible maps, but here it almost looks like it was. The below video shows the passion that went into this creation, as well as outlining some of the hurdles InfernoPlus faced along the way and how they rigged a way around them.

You can check out InfernoPlus' other mods on their youtube channel, and if you're into Halo it is well worth a look at what this creator is achieving with that game. If you're more interested in the Minecraft side of things, you can check out our list of the best Minecraft mods here.

Rich is a games journalist with 15 years' experience, beginning his career on Edge magazine before working for a wide range of outlets, including Ars Technica, Eurogamer, GamesRadar+, Gamespot, the Guardian, IGN, the New Statesman, Polygon, and Vice. He was the editor of Kotaku UK, the UK arm of Kotaku, for three years before joining PC Gamer. He is the author of a Brief History of Video Games, a full history of the medium, which the Midwest Book Review described as "[a] must-read for serious minded game historians and curious video game connoisseurs alike."