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Psychedelic platformer Spinch looks like a trip

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The last time we wrote about Spinch, back in 2018, we were expecting to get our hands on it that summer. That never panned out, but we've now got a new release date to look forward to, September 3, and a weird trailer to tide us over until then. 

As the titular "hyper-agile organism," you'll need to bounce, dash and shoot your way through a kaleidoscopic world filled with weird and warped enemies determined to stop you from rescuing your babies—babies, I should add, you can collect and weaponise. Yes, you can use your own children as ammunition. 

Jesse Jacobs' psychedelic art gives the bouncy platformer a singular style, and you can pause the trailer just about anywhere and see something eye-catching and bizarre. It looks a bit like the strangest parts of a Pendleton Ward cartoon transmogrified into a game.

When you first start bounding around a level, don't expect it to make much sense. To figure out the ins and outs of these colourful death traps, you'll need to keep replaying sections until you master them. Quick reflexes will help, too. That means I'm outta luck. 

Actually, I might be too quick to give up. There are no lives, and no way to lose the game, and Queen Bee Games says it's designed for players of all experience levels, not just speedrunners looking for a challenge.

You can grab Spinch via Steam on September 3.

Fraser Brown
Fraser Brown

Fraser is the UK online editor and has actually met The Internet in person. With over a decade of experience, he's been around the block a few times, serving as a freelancer, news editor and prolific reviewer. Strategy games have been a 30-year-long obsession, from tiny RTSs to sprawling political sims, and he never turns down the chance to rave about Total War or Crusader Kings. He's also been known to set up shop in the latest MMO and likes to wind down with an endlessly deep, systemic RPG. These days, when he's not editing, he can usually be found writing features that are 1,000 words too long or talking about his dog.