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Play Predator: Hunting Grounds early in the upcoming free trial weekend

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Predator: Hunting Grounds, which dropped its PS4 exclusive status (opens in new tab) late last year, is almost upon us. The asymmetrical multiplayer shooter is coming on April 20, but prospective marines and sneaky aliens will also get to take it for a spin early, during next month's free trial weekend. 

On PS4, the trial will only be available to PS Plus members, but developer IllFonic doesn't list any PC restrictions—you just need to download it from the Epic Games Store (opens in new tab) on March 27. Both groups of players will be able to duke it out together, too, as it already has crossplay support. 

Despite there only being one good movie, the Predator is an enduring sci-fi monster and a bit of a badass, so I'm surprised that Hunting Grounds has been kind of flying under the radar. I'd forgotten all about it until this week. The setup sounds perfect for a Predator game, though I wouldn't say no to a good singleplayer campaign.

Another trailer that arrived this week, below, gives us a better look at the Predator's murderous rampage. He's a lot less sneaky than his movie counterparts, but that could just be for the trailer. He's got a cloak, thermal vision and all the other tricks you'd expect.

Here's when Predator: Hunting Grounds will be available:

  • Japan / Asia- 15:00 JST
  • Europe / Australia / New Zealand - 17:00 CET
  • North America - 17:00 PST

The trial ends on March 29 at 11:59 pm.

Fraser is the UK online editor and has actually met The Internet in person. With over a decade of experience, he's been around the block a few times, serving as a freelancer, news editor and prolific reviewer. Strategy games have been a 30-year-long obsession, from tiny RTSs to sprawling political sims, and he never turns down the chance to rave about Total War or Crusader Kings. He's also been known to set up shop in the latest MMO and likes to wind down with an endlessly deep, systemic RPG. These days, when he's not editing, he can usually be found writing features that are 1,000 words too long or talking about his dog.