Skip to main content

Among Us 2 cancelled in favour of ongoing work on the current game

(Image credit: Innersloth)
Sneak around with these Among Us guides

Among Us

(Image credit: Innersloth)

Among Us tips: Betray your buddies
Among Us crossplay: Deception across platforms
Among Us error codes: What they mean
Among Us Halloween costumes: Unlock festive outfits and hats

A month after its announcement, a sequel to the suddenly huge "multiplayer space mystery" Among Us has been cancelled. As far as cancellations go, it's a relatively welcome one: studio Innersloth has opted to keep working on (and fixing) the original game.

In its announcement, Innersloth writes that while the Among Us codebase is unwieldy and antiquated, it makes sense to continue work on it given its sudden popularity. Of course, that means a lot of work adapting it for a playerbase much larger than the studio ever expected.

"We have decided to cancel Among Us 2 and instead put all our focus into improving Among Us 1," the post reads. "All of the content we had planned for Among Us 2 will instead go into Among Us 1." 

"This is probably the more difficult choice because it means going deep into the core code of the game and reworking several parts of it."

It seems like the studio will be busy. Following the game's sudden ascent to widespread Twitch popularity its servers have been copping a hammering, which is a situation still being addressed. More excitingly, colorblind support is on the horizon, as is a new stage and a friends system.

Upon announcing the sequel last month, Innersloth noted that the original game was "not created to be this big" and as a result, it was "extremely hard to add more things without breaking existing things". Still, it's a big risk to fragment the playerbase of such a seemingly niche title, so it's probably a wise move to fix the game people already have.

Shaun is PC Gamer’s Australian editor and news writer. He mostly plays platformers and RPGs, and keeps a close eye on anything of particular interest to antipodean audiences. He (rather obsessively) tracks the movements of the Doom modding community, too.