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Loot Crate launches an indie game subscription service

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Loot Crate and Chrono.gg have announced the launch of a new subscription service called Loot Play that brings subscribers five "high quality, highly curated" indie games each month. Each "crate" will be delivered on the 17th of every month in the form of Steam codes, which means the games are yours to keep even if you cancel your subscription. 

"We want to help subscribers find new games that are curated with a focus on creative new voices, and we want to help these independent studios reach new audiences through our large network of Looters," Loot Crate VP of Product Marketing and Communications Erik Reynolds said. "Loot Play will be Loot Crate’s first digital subscription product and will open the door for the company to continue its growth through digital offerings, redefine collecting and explore the relationship fans have with content."   

A bit like the Humble Monthly Bundle, Loot Play will feature one monthly "anchor" game and four mystery games that will be revealed when the crate goes live. The first such game will be Crossing Souls, the 80s-themed adventure about a group of kids trying to save the world from a supernatural threat.   

Loot Play runs from $10 per month with a one-year subscription to $12 on a month-by-month basis. That might seem a little steep compared to the Humble Monthly, which features more (and more mainstream) games for $12 per month, but we can't really judge that until we know what the rest of the games in the initial bundle are—maybe they'll knock our socks off.   

One odd thing about Loot Play is that despite being an entirely digital service—the Steam codes are delivered via email—Loot Play is currently only available in the US. "Currently" suggests that international service is at least being looked at, but for now, those of us who live outside the country are out of luck. Either way, you can find out more at lootcrate.com

Andy has been gaming on PCs from the very beginning, starting as a youngster with text adventures and primitive action games on a cassette-based TRS80. From there he graduated to the glory days of Sierra Online adventures and Microprose sims, ran a local BBS, learned how to build PCs, and developed a longstanding love of RPGs, immersive sims, and shooters. He began writing videogame news in 2007 for The Escapist and somehow managed to avoid getting fired until 2014, when he joined the storied ranks of PC Gamer. He covers all aspects of the industry, from new game announcements and patch notes to legal disputes, Twitch beefs, esports, and Henry Cavill. Lots of Henry Cavill.