We'll have to wait a bit longer for those hot new AMD gaming CPUs

AMD Ryzen 7000 X3D
(Image credit: AMD)
Audio player loading…

Update: Remember that launch date for AMD's new 3D V-Cache powered Ryzen 7000 X3D processors (opens in new tab) has popped up on its own website we mentioned yesterday? The February 14 one? Turns out it was a mistake and it's been removed from AMD's website.

According to WCCFTech (opens in new tab), the chips will still launch next month, but not on the 14th. That implies a launch later in the month. But the date has certainly been removed from AMD's website.

We also still don't know exactly how large a ransom you'll have to pay for the benefit of the 3D-stacked cache memory. Currently, the Ryzen 9 7950X goes for around $570 and the 5900X for roughly $460. The X3D versions of those chips will obviously be more than that, but quite how much more isn't clear.

The Ryzen 7 7800X3D, meanwhile, doesn't have a direct equivalent non-X3D variant. The nearest AMD sells is the $350 Ryzen 7 7700X. Incidentally, the 5800X3D also lacks an official base clock, with just the 5GHz Turbo speed listed for now.

The 3D V-Cache shizz', of course, is all about using 3D packaging technology to ramp up the cache memory of CPUs, the benefit being reducing traffic over the CPU's memory bus, reducing latency and boosting frame rates.

AMD's last-gen Ryzen 7 5800X3D (opens in new tab) was quite the gaming beast, so we're very interested to see exactly how much gaming benefit the V-Cache serves up on the new 7000 Series CPUs. We'll be reviewing the new chips as soon as we can get our hands on them. Whenever that is.

Image (opens in new tab)


Best CPU for gaming: Top chips from Intel and AMD
Best gaming motherboard: The right boards
Best graphics card: Your perfect pixel-pusher awaits Best SSD for gaming: Get into the game first

Jeremy Laird
Hardware writer

Jeremy has been writing about technology and PCs since the 90nm Netburst era (Google it!) and enjoys nothing more than a serious dissertation on the finer points of monitor input lag and overshoot followed by a forensic examination of advanced lithography. Or maybe he just likes machines that go “ping!” He also has a thing for tennis and cars.