Road Rash successor Road Redemption rides out of Early Access

Audio player loading…

If you've been putting off having a look at Road Redemption—the spiritual successor to Road Rash that was Kickstarted back in 2013—because it's in Early Access then now is the time to give it a look. 

This is the motorbike combat game with the very modern conceit of procedurally generated levels, in addition to the more nostalgic joys of riding a motorbike very fast and thwacking other riders as you overtake them.

I had a play of the Early Access version recently, and had quite a good time.

Randomized tracks make it impossible to learn layouts in advance and instead I just react to them, staying alert to sudden turns or detours full of power-ups rather than building up muscle memory, even though the tracks are obviously assembled from recognizable pieces like slot car tracks. And sometimes you get a weird one, like the time I got a warning about psychedelics being used in the area and then cars started falling from the sky, smashing into the bitumen as I swerved through a storm of shattering metal. 

It's available on Steam now.

Jody Macgregor
Weekend/AU Editor

Jody's first computer was a Commodore 64, so he remembers having to use a code wheel to play Pool of Radiance. A former music journalist who interviewed everyone from Giorgio Moroder to Trent Reznor, Jody also co-hosted Australia's first radio show about videogames, Zed Games (opens in new tab). He's written for Rock Paper Shotgun (opens in new tab), The Big Issue, GamesRadar (opens in new tab), Zam (opens in new tab), Glixel (opens in new tab), Five Out of Ten Magazine (opens in new tab), and Playboy.com (opens in new tab), whose cheques with the bunny logo made for fun conversations at the bank. Jody's first article for PC Gamer was about the audio of Alien Isolation, published in 2015, and since then he's written about why Silent Hill belongs on PC, why Recettear: An Item Shop's Tale is the best fantasy shopkeeper tycoon game, and how weird Lost Ark can get. Jody edited PC Gamer Indie from 2017 to 2018, and he eventually lived up to his promise to play every Warhammer videogame.