Riot announces an Arcane/Among Us collaboration, and details free stuff across its own games

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Riot Games has announced some detail on Progress Days (opens in new tab), the next part of the Riot X Arcane shenanigans going on around the launch of the publisher's first animated series. Arcane has proven something of a surprise package, with even non-LoL fans finding something to love. PCG's own Steven Messner thinks it's amazing (opens in new tab).

Progress Days is a holiday that the show's town of Piltover celebrates, and the Progress Days event is basically a load of Arcane tie-ins across Riot's games—along with a surprise. There will be an Arcane/Among Us crossover, allowing players of that game to look like a Piltover enforcer (sus) or the character Heimerdinger. There's no other details on what else the collaboration will involve.

As well as this, we get a look at the already announced crossover with Fortnite (featuring Jinx) and the collab with PUBG Mobile: proper PUBG is not getting anything, so insert sadface here.

Progress Days is basically going to be running across Riot's slate for the next month: you can read a list of everything happening here. League of Legends players get a new thing called the Council Archives, where they can study more of Arcane’s story, and can unlock an Arcane Jayce outfit by winning a game (or playing three). Runeterra and Wild Rift also receive a bunch of Arcane-linked cosmetics, and expect another tranche to be announced next week.

Riot obviously wants you to watch Arcane but, thing is, you probably should (opens in new tab).

Rich is a games journalist with 15 years' experience, beginning his career on Edge magazine before working for a wide range of outlets, including Ars Technica, Eurogamer, GamesRadar+, Gamespot, the Guardian, IGN, the New Statesman, Polygon, and Vice. He was the editor of Kotaku UK, the UK arm of Kotaku, for three years before joining PC Gamer. He is the author of a Brief History of Video Games, a full history of the medium, which the Midwest Book Review described as "[a] must-read for serious minded game historians and curious video game connoisseurs alike."