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Yes, Nvidia's RTX 3080 can run Crysis Remastered at 4K in 'Can it Run Crysis?' mode

Crysis Remastered running on the RTX 3080 at 4K
(Image credit: Future)

The Nvidia RTX 3080 launched yesterday and, for the five people who managed to pick up a card, there is but one question: can it run Crysis Remastered? We recently spoke to the development team responsible for making the memefied classic relevant in 2020, and they told us that "In 4k, there is no card out there which can run it in 'Can it Run Crysis mode' at 30 FPS." 

At the time that might have been true, but today the new Nvidia Ampere-based cards seem to be capable of pushing past that. 

By a little more than 7 fps on average. 

Yes, with the RTX 3080 running the new 'Can it Run Crysis?' mode at 4K, with all the ray traced bells and whistles, the new GPU can manage a heady 37.46 fps. You can watch the full majesty below, or via YouTube if you prefer. 

Can it run Crysis?

Colorful RTX 3080 iGame Advanced

Average: 37.46 fps
99th percentile: 25.66 fps
Average power draw: 319W
Peak power draw: 386W

We've thrown one of the third-party cards at the new Crysis Remastered GPU benchmark with everything pushed to the limit, including hardware-based ray tracing and the highest resolution our 55-inch Philips Momentum monitor can manage. It's the frankly monstrous Colorful iGame Advanced RTX 3080, and it's a triple-slot, triple PCIe power connection toting card that really weighs down my test rig.

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(Image credit: Future)
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(Image credit: Future)
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(Image credit: Future)

And it seems to need all that power to be able to run the game at that level, with the average power draw sitting at 319W with a peak of 386W. That's just the board power, not platform power. Nvidia has provided us with its PCAT power measurement tool, which enables us to get readings directly from the power connectors so we know exactly how much juice the card as a whole is drawing.

Gotta say, I'm not massively taken with how the game looks, even at the max settings, but it does look a lot sharper down at ground level when you're actually playing the game yourself. Still, do you really want to go back 13 years just to punish your graphics card?

Dave has been obsessed with gaming since the days of Zaxxon on the Colecovision, and code books for the Commodore Vic 20 (Death Race 2000!). He built his first gaming PC at the tender age of 16, and finally finished bug-fixing the Cyrix-based system around a year later. When he dropped it out of the window. Thankfully it's a lot easier to build a gaming rig now there are no motherboard jumper switches, though he has been breaking technology ever since… at least he gets paid for it now.