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Massive Dark Souls 'Daughters of Ash' mod now available for Remastered edition

Back in January we wrote about Daughters of Ash, a long-in-development mod for Dark Souls that adds piles of new material to the game. At the time it was only available for the original 'Prepare to Die' PC release of Dark Souls, but now compatible with the 2018 Remastered release of Dark Souls, too. 

Here's a general description: Daughters of Ash "changes a great deal of the game's content, restores some cut content, and adds many new events and encounters. Its core aim is to replicate the feeling of playing Dark Souls for the first time."

There are new enemies, new bosses that are meant to be interesting and not just hard, lore items, item-items, and more, all using original game assets. So certain objects you've seen before (or ones you've never seen because they were cut during development) will have different uses in the game, but you won't see any jarring, out-of-place fan-created creatures or amateurish texture work in here.

This Remaster release also marks a 1.4 update to the mod, which the developer has been tinkering with since its Prepare to Die Edition release a few months ago. You can read a more detailed rundown of what Daughters of Ash adds to Dark Souls in this Reddit post.

You can download Daughters of Ash from Nexusmods. Note that the developers say "if you play it online, you will almost certainly be banned. Setting your Steam to Offline Mode before playing is the safest way to play Daughters of Ash."

Wes Fenlon

Wes has been covering games and hardware for more than 10 years, first at tech sites like The Wirecutter and Tested before joining the PC Gamer team in 2014. Wes plays a little bit of everything, but he'll always jump at the chance to cover emulation and Japanese games. When he's not obsessively optimizing and re-optimizing a tangle of conveyor belts in Satisfactory (it's really becoming a problem), he's probably playing a 20-year-old RPG or some opaque ASCII roguelike. With a focus on writing and editing features, he seeks out personal stories and in-depth histories from the corners of PC gaming and its niche communities. 50% pizza by volume (deep dish, to be specific).