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Being a disembodied hand won't stop this cop from dealing out justice

A hand, who is a cop, holding a gun
(Image credit: Jeff Ramos)

What happens when you take Thing from The Addams Family and give it a handgun license? You get Michael McWrist, a loose cannon detective packed into a single disembodied right hand.

Handcop is a very strange, very real game currently being developed by Brazilian developer Jeff Ramos. Working as a one-man team, Ramos has had Handcop in the pipeline since at least February, though Handcop truly grabbed the internet's attention with a gif posted to Reddit last week with the winking caption "Too lazy to animate the whole body". 

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Speaking to IGN, Ramos stresses that this isn't just a gimmick. The developer wants Handcop to be a properly compelling stealth-action game, using your diminutive stature to finger-walk your way around baddies. There are dashes, executions, melee combat and throwable weapons, with plans to add rings that boost your stats.

"Different from most comedy games, the shooting is for real here," Ramos said. "It is very satisfying and the headshots are superb." 

Ramos has been messing with disembodied hand prototypes for some time, a habit that he says started when he was "playing finger football with my wife and saw a TV commercial featuring the hand from The Addams Family". One of these is even playable on Itch, a neon-blasted cyberpunk shooter called Hand of Pain developed for a game jam last September.

(Image credit: Jeff Ramos)

In the time since, Handcop has taken on a more dishevelled, '80s cop flair, complete with striped shirt and loose tie. Ramos is currently seeking funding and looking for a publisher to help make Handcop a reality. He reckons the game has the potential to be "much more than what a solo dev with zero funding" can do—but even if he doesn't find funding, it sounds like he's determined to make Handcop a reality.

Personally, I look forward to getting my hands on it when it's finished. Get it?

Natalie Clayton

20 years ago, Nat played Jet Set Radio Future for the first time—and she's not stopped thinking about games since. Joining PC Gamer in 2020, she comes from three years of freelance reporting at Rock Paper Shotgun, Waypoint, VG247 and more. Embedded in the European indie scene and having herself developed critically acclaimed small games like Can Androids Pray, Nat is always looking for a new curiosity to scream about—whether it's the next best indie darling, or simply someone modding a Scotmid into Black Mesa. She's also played for a competitive Splatoon team, and unofficially appears in Apex Legends under the pseudonym Horizon.