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Shadow Arena, the Black Desert Online battle royale spin-off, enters beta soon

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Sandbox MMO Black Desert Online is offering its more action-inclined fans a new diversion this month in the form of the Shadow Arena beta. Originally a mode inside the MMO, it's been expanded into a 40-player standalone that's evocative of battle royales, but with features drawn from its MMO progenitor, as well as MOBAs. 

The goal, not surprisingly, is to be the last player standing. Initially, there will be nine playable characters, each with a different fighting style that will presumably be familiar if you've spent time in Black Desert Online. During the battle, you'll need to fight monsters, collect loot and become more powerful, all to make your conflicts with other players easier. 

Prospective fighters can sign up here now, but the beta won't kick off until February 27, after which it will run until March 8. 

For me, the appeal of Black Desert Online is its sandbox trading system. Sure, it's a very solid action MMO, but I had a much more engaging time selling potatoes and building a boozy empire. I was more interested in hiring goblins than slaying them. Shadow Arena doesn't sound like one for me, then, but I confess I'm at least a little bit intrigued, if only because fantasy battle royals tickle my fancy a lot more than all the gun-crazy ones. 

Shadow Arena is expected to launch in full during the first half of the year.

Fraser Brown
Fraser Brown

Fraser is the UK online editor and has actually met The Internet in person. With over a decade of experience, he's been around the block a few times, serving as a freelancer, news editor and prolific reviewer. Strategy games have been a 30-year-long obsession, from tiny RTSs to sprawling political sims, and he never turns down the chance to rave about Total War or Crusader Kings. He's also been known to set up shop in the latest MMO and likes to wind down with an endlessly deep, systemic RPG. These days, when he's not editing, he can usually be found writing features that are 1,000 words too long or talking about his dog.