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Borderlands 3 and the second campaign expansion are coming to Steam in March

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Borderlands 3 launched on September 13 as an Epic Games Store exclusive, a move that didn't go over super-well with the whole of the fan base. Gearbox boss Randy Pitchford defended the decision (and denied responsibility for it), and ultimately it didn't seem to have too much of a negative impact on sales: It became the fastest-selling game in the history of publisher 2K Games, which said that its sales on the Epic Games Store were "incredibly strong."

But like most other EGS exclusives, this one was timed, and Borderlands 3 is now listed on Steam. Crossplay between the Steam and Epic versions will be supported at launch, and Gearbox plans to add more cross-platform features such as the ability to mail weapons across platforms in subsequent weeks. Currently, only the Super Deluxe edition, which includes bonus content and the four-DLC season pass, is listed, but a 2K rep confirmed that all three editions currently available from Epic will be on Steam. 

The Steam announcement comes alongside the reveal of the second Borderlands 3 expansion, Guns, Love, and Tentacles: The Marriage of Wainwright and Hammerlock. Sir Alistair Hammerlock and Wainwright Jakobs have invited you to take part in their wedding ceremony on the ice planet Xylourgos, but unfortunately a band of cultists have crashed the party and it falls to you to sort things out. The expansion will see the return of Gaige, the Mechromancer from Borderlands 2, and her robot pal Deathtrap, and add new cosmetics, Legendary gear, and "supremely powerful Class Mods."

Guns, Love, and Tentacles: the Marriage of Wainwright and Hammerlock will go live on March 26. You can get a closer look at what's in store at borderlands.com.

Andy has been gaming on PCs from the very beginning, starting as a youngster with text adventures and primitive action games on a cassette-based TRS80. From there he graduated to the glory days of Sierra Online adventures and Microprose sims, ran a local BBS, learned how to build PCs, and developed a longstanding love of RPGs, immersive sims, and shooters. He began writing videogame news in 2007 for The Escapist and somehow managed to avoid getting fired until 2014, when he joined the storied ranks of PC Gamer. He covers all aspects of the industry, from new game announcements and patch notes to legal disputes, Twitch beefs, esports, and Henry Cavill. Lots of Henry Cavill.