Skip to main content

Hitman 3's save transfer site is buckling under the pressure

Agent 47 channels James Bond
(Image credit: IO Interactive)
Audio player loading…

A website designed to help seasoned assassins carry over their Hitman 2 progression into Hitman 3 is struggling to keep up with demand, says developer IO Interactive.

A major feature of the final entry in this Hitman trilogy is that it carries over player progression from the previous two games. Despite some confusion around launch about how the game being an Epic exclusive may affect this, it's now confirmed that Hitman 1 & 2 owners on Steam will get to carry their own Agent 47s over to Epic copies of Hitman 3. But this involves a site built to manage this one-time transfer and, with demand high, it is experiencing some major issues.

Players are reporting attempts to transfer progress are frequently met with "failed" or "Error" status notifications. That's if the site will even let them log in at all, and people who skipped out on making an IO account last time around are now struggling to get signed up.

IO explained on Twitter that the site simply can't cope with the thousands of players attempting to carry over their saves.

See more

On top of handling Steam-to-Epic progression, the site also has to manage carryover saves from console players moving between the two games, across last- and current-gen hardware. While IO continue to work on a fix for their transfer issues, the problems still seem pretty widespread.

Naturally, this also means plenty of folk have yet to step into Hitman 3. Transferring your old saves overwrites any existing Hitman 3 data, which is why IO recommend you do it before starting it up. The dev doesn't currently have a timeframe for when this issue will be resolved, but let's hope it comes soon. Andy K adored the World Of Assassination's final act in his Hitman 3 review, calling it "IO's most creative and surprising assassination sim yet."

Natalie Clayton

20 years ago, Nat played Jet Set Radio Future for the first time—and she's not stopped thinking about games since. Joining PC Gamer in 2020, she comes from three years of freelance reporting at Rock Paper Shotgun, Waypoint, VG247 and more. Embedded in the European indie scene and having herself developed critically acclaimed small games like Can Androids Pray, Nat is always looking for a new curiosity to scream about—whether it's the next best indie darling, or simply someone modding a Scotmid into Black Mesa. She's also played for a competitive Splatoon team, and unofficially appears in Apex Legends under the pseudonym Horizon.